Bacteriological profile in patients with cesarean infection at Ruhengeri level two teaching Hospital

  • HABANABAKIZE Jean Baptiste Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • ISHIMWE ALAIN PRUDENCE Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • Ntezirizaza Evariste Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • KANOBAYITA Nadia Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • UWIRINGIYIMANA Athanasie Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Abstract

Background: A cesarean infection is a referral hospital acquired bacterial infection that occurs after deliver by cesarean section which could be emergency or elective. As highlighted by the various researchers that the infections following a cesarean delivery, which some people call a C-section, are common. The wound coming into contact with bacteria or other harmful microbes is a common cause of these infections. The main objective of this study was the assessment of bacteria isolated from cesarean infection patients attending Ruhengeri level two teaching hospital.


Methodology: A cross-sectional study was conducted and total of 30 wound swabs of cesarean were collected from inpatient of Ruhengeri level two teaching hospital.Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software (version 20).


Results: The results showed that the most predominant bacteria isolated from patients with cesarean infection was S. aureus (28.1%) followed by S. pyogenes (18.8%), K. pneumoniae (18.8%), P. aeruginosa (12.5%), S.epidermidis (9.4%), E. coli (6.3%) and P. mirabilis(6.3%). Antibiotics sensitivity test was performed, so this study showed the predominant antibiotic which were sensitively to different bacteria were Chloramphenicol, Gentamycin and Norfloxacin and most bacteria were resistance to Rifampicin and Vancomycin.


Conclusion: This study has shown that there are many bacteria that may be isolated in cesarean infection. It has also shown that some of the isolated bacteria were sensitive and other were resistant to Rifampicin and Vancomycin. The study recommends that Rwandan government should create more clinical microbiological laboratory, in Rwanda, in order to minimize the antibiotic resistance and also on the side of health care providers, especially at Ruhengeri level two teaching hospital, they should use the experienced workers in order to minimise the risks of getting caesarean infection and also to recommend the patients taking care their wound.


 Keywords: Cesarean infection, Bacteria, Antibiotics, Bacteriological profile

Keywords: Cesarean infection, Bacteria, Antibiotics, Bacteriological profile

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Author Biographies

HABANABAKIZE Jean Baptiste, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

ISHIMWE ALAIN PRUDENCE, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

Ntezirizaza Evariste, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

KANOBAYITA Nadia, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

UWIRINGIYIMANA Athanasie, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

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Jean Baptiste H, ALAIN PRUDENCE I, Evariste N, Nadia K, Athanasie U. Bacteriological profile in patients with cesarean infection at Ruhengeri level two teaching Hospital. JDDT [Internet]. 15Jun.2024 [cited 17Jul.2024];14(6):39-3. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/6627

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