Isolation and Identification of Bacteria from Electronic devices used by Students and Staffs in Ines Ruhengeri

  • UWIZEYIMANA Jean Pierre Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • ISHIMWE ALAIN PRUDENCE Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • NZABANTERURA Innocent Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • BIZIMANA Ezechiel Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • UWIHANGANYE Jean Chrysostome Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • Ndayambaje Jean de Dieu Ines Ruhengeri
  • NZEYIMANA Godefroid Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • IRAKOZE Jean Polycarpe Delphin Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Abstract

Background: Electronic devices have become one of the most essential accessories being used in daily lives including schools. Those devices increase the communication and using them makes learning much easier. Microbial contamination of electronic devices and inanimate surface of electronic equipment at INES-Ruhengeri can have a significant role for transmission of pathogenic bacteria.


Aim: The aim of this study was to isolate and identify bacteria from electronic devices used by students and staffs at INES-Ruhengeri University.


Methodology: This cross-sectional study was done on 40 electronic devices such as computers, microscopes, global positioning system (GPS) and total stations A random sampling method was applied from sterile swab soaked in peptone water solution by the technique of bearing on the surface of the entire devices and then placed in a transport medium. Collected samples were then taken in INES-Ruhengeri Microbiology laboratory for further experiments.


Results: All 40 electronic devices were contaminated with bacteria. The most predominant bacteria isolated from electronic devices was S.aureus (25.9%) followed by Bacillus spp(24.1%), K.pneumonia(12.9%), S.epidermis(12.9%), Micrococcus spp(7.4%), P.aeruginosa(5.5%), E.coli(3.3%), Salmonella spp(3.3%) and Shigella spp(3.3%). Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of selected antibiotics was performed. Norfloxin was the most sensitive antibiotic on all isolated bacteria. Chloramphenicol antibiotic shown no activity over any of the isolated bacteria, to imply that all bacteria had resistance on it.


 Conclusion: This study shown that there is bacterial contamination to all devices and antibiotic susceptibility test shown that some antibiotics were sensitive and resistant to the isolated bacteria.

Keywords: Bacterial contamination, electronic devices, Antimicrobial susceptibility test

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Author Biographies

UWIZEYIMANA Jean Pierre, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

King Faisal Hospital, Rwanda

ISHIMWE ALAIN PRUDENCE, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

NZABANTERURA Innocent, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

University Teaching Hospital of Butare, Rwanda

BIZIMANA Ezechiel, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

UWIHANGANYE Jean Chrysostome, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Rwanda Military Hospital, Rwanda

Ndayambaje Jean de Dieu, Ines Ruhengeri

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

NZEYIMANA Godefroid, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

IRAKOZE Jean Polycarpe Delphin, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

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Jean Pierre U, ALAIN PRUDENCE I, Innocent N, Ezechiel B, Chrysostome U, Jean de Dieu N, Godefroid N, Jean Polycarpe Delphin I. Isolation and Identification of Bacteria from Electronic devices used by Students and Staffs in Ines Ruhengeri. JDDT [Internet]. 15Jun.2024 [cited 17Jul.2024];14(6):131-7. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/6650

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