Evaluation of CD4 Count in HIV Infected Pregnant Women at Kibagabaga Level Two Teaching Hospital

  • Evariste NTEZIRIZAZA Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • Ishimwe Alain Prudence Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • Baptiste Jean Habanabakize Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • Tuyishime Jean De Dieu Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Abstract

CD4 count measures the degree of immunosuppression in HIV-positive patients and is used to monitor HIV infection progression in human body. HIV is a virus that attacks the body’s immune system and if not treated, can lead to AIDS The rate of CD4 cells destruction is directly proportional to progressive replication of HIV. Pregnant women infected with HIV have high risk of mother to child transmission of HIV infection and are prone to excessive immunosuppression and increased viral load if their CD4 cell count is not properly maintained. Pregnancy may influence CD4 cells count reduction or don’t, that’s why this study focused on evaluation of CD4 count in HIV infected pregnant women. The objectives of this study were to determine the association between pregnancy trimesters and CD4 count among HIV infected pregnant women at KDH. The study was a cross sectional study which included 46 patients who visited kibagabaga level two teaching hospital in 5 months. Data were obtained by collecting venous blood of patients, testing their CD4 count and use of a questionnaire to evaluate the risk factors associated with changes in CD4 count. Data collected were analysed using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) software version 22.0 and Microsoft word, the presentation of results was done using tables. Variables with p-value less than or equal to 0.05 were considered statistically significant. The study showed that there is an association between pregnancy trimesters and CD4 count among HIV infected pregnant women where 21(45.6%) women were in third trimester and had the highest CD4 count compared to women in the 2nd trimester 14(30.4%) followed by women in 1st trimester 11(24%) with p-value of 0.04 which is statistically significant. In evaluated CD4 count changes, associated risk factors were, antiretroviral treatment intake, diet intake, education level, pregnancy trimester, and closely spaced pregnancies. Which were found to have p-values 0.00, 0.00, 0.04, 0.04 and 0.01 that were statistically significant respectively.


Keywords: HIV, CD4 Count, Pregnant women

Keywords: HIV, CD4 Count, Pregnant women, HIV, CD4 Count, Pregnant women

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Author Biographies

Evariste NTEZIRIZAZA, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ishimwe Alain Prudence, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Baptiste Jean Habanabakize, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Tuyishime Jean De Dieu, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

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NTEZIRIZAZA E, Alain Prudence I, Habanabakize BJ, Jean De Dieu T. Evaluation of CD4 Count in HIV Infected Pregnant Women at Kibagabaga Level Two Teaching Hospital. JDDT [Internet]. 15May2024 [cited 17May2024];14(5):1-. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/6513