Screening of Phytochemicals and Antioxidant Potential of Leaves Extract of Litsea glutinosa

  • Brijesh K. Sharma Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan University, NH-12 Hoshangabad Road, Misrod, Bhopal-462026 (M.P.) India
  • Kavita R. Loksh Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan University, NH-12 Hoshangabad Road, Misrod, Bhopal-462026 (M.P.) India
  • Alok Pal Jain Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan University, NH-12 Hoshangabad Road, Misrod, Bhopal-462026 (M.P.) India

Abstract

Litsea glutinosa (Lour) leaves are deliberated as worthy traditional medicine. The aim of this study was to screen the phytochemicals, to evaluate the total flavonoid contents as well as antioxidant activity of various extract of Litsea glutinosa (Lour). The phytochemical analysis of each solvent extract was also carried out. Total flavonoid content was determined by aluminium chloride colorimetric assay. Antioxidant activity was determined using 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), Ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) and Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) free radical scavenger methods. Phytochemical screening of various extract revealed the presence of Alkaloids, Flavonoids, Diterpenes, Proteins, Carbohydrate and Saponins. The total flavonoid content was found 1.89, 5.01 and 3.16 mg/100mg of dry weight of pet ether, ethanol and aqueous extract respectively, expressed as Quercetin equivalents. Antioxidant activity was performed using three methods DPPH, Ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) assay and Hydrogen Peroxide scavenging activity.  Our current results emerged that Litsea glutinosa (Lour) act as an antioxidant agent due to its free radical scavenging. So, the plant may be further pursued to find out for its pharmacological active natural products.


Keywords: Litsea glutinosa (Lour), Qualitative, Quantitative phytochemical, Antioxidant activity.

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Author Biographies

Brijesh K. Sharma, Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan University, NH-12 Hoshangabad Road, Misrod, Bhopal-462026 (M.P.) India

Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan University, NH-12 Hoshangabad Road, Misrod, Bhopal-462026 (M.P.) India  

Kavita R. Loksh, Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan University, NH-12 Hoshangabad Road, Misrod, Bhopal-462026 (M.P.) India

Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan University, NH-12 Hoshangabad Road, Misrod, Bhopal-462026 (M.P.) India  

Alok Pal Jain, Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan University, NH-12 Hoshangabad Road, Misrod, Bhopal-462026 (M.P.) India

Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan University, NH-12 Hoshangabad Road, Misrod, Bhopal-462026 (M.P.) India  

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Sharma BK, Loksh KR, Jain AP. Screening of Phytochemicals and Antioxidant Potential of Leaves Extract of Litsea glutinosa. JDDT [Internet]. 28Mar.2020 [cited 18Jun.2021];9(4-s):1214-7. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/3939