Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus sp. Among Pregnant Women Attending General Hospitals in Delta Central Senatorial District, Nigeria

Abstract

This study aimed to assess the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus sp. among pregnant women who visit the General Hospital in Delta Central Senatorial District, Nigeria. Samples were collected from the vaginal and rectum areas of pregnant women attending the General Hospitals of Abraka, Oghara, Udu, Ughelli North and Ughelli South. Bacteriological and biochemical analyses were conducted to isolate, characterize, and identify the bacteria. Two types of bacteria were found; Enterococcus sp. and Staphylococcus sp. The study result showed that Staphylococcus aureus (13.7%) was more prevalent than other isolates and was found in samples obtained from Udu General Hospital. In comparison, Ughelli South General Hospital had the lowest prevalence for S. aureus (7.9%). Samples from Oghara General Hospital had the highest prevalence for Enterococcus sp. (3.7%) while the lowest prevalence for Enterococcus sp. (1.1%) was obtained from Ughelli South General Hospital. S. aureus (51.6%) was found to be the most prevalent bacterium, while Enterococcus sp. (11.1%) was the least prevalent. The bacterial load from the vaginal swab samples was higher than that of rectum swab samples, which suggests that pregnant women attending these hospitals may have infections. The total bacterial count among pregnant women was highest in samples obtained from Udu General Hospital (5.4±0.5), followed by Abraka (5.0±0.6), Oghara (4.8±0.2), and Ughelli North (4.5±0.15), and while the least count was recorded from samples obtained from Ughelli South General Hospital (3.0±0.2). This study helps manage and plan future medical treatments. Pregnant women should be screened early in their pregnancies, between the 12th and 16th weeks, which is the second trimester, and treated appropriately to avoid complications that arise from untreated infections. 


Keywords: Prevalence, vaginal, pregnancy, women, infection

Keywords: Prevalence, vaginal, pregnancy, women, infection

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Olivia Sochi Egbule, Department of Microbiology, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria

Department of Microbiology, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria

Emmanuel Morka, Department of Microbiology, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria

Department of Microbiology, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria

Patricia Konye Omenogor, Department of Nursing Science, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria

Department of Nursing Science, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria

References

1. Kaambo E, Charlene WJ, The Threat of Aerobic Vaginitis to Pregnancy and Neonatal Morbidity: African Journal of Reproductive Health, 2017; 21(2):109-118. https://doi.org/10.29063/ajrh2017/v21i2.12
2. Priscilla R, Latha G, Rajan D, Sultana M, Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance pattern of bacterial strains isolated from patients with urinary tract infection: MOJ Public Health, 2017; 5(1):32-35. https://doi.org/10.15406/mojph.2017.05.00117
3. Lewis DF, Robichaux AG, Jaekle RK, Marcum NG, Stedman CM, Urolithiasis in pregnancy: diagnosis, management, and pregnancy outcome: Obstetrics Gynecology Survey, 2015; 58(1):446-447. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.OGX.0000074323.48257.83
4. Akortha RE, Egbule 0S, Transfer of tetracycline gene (tet1) Between Replicons in some enteric bacteria of Diarrhoeal origin from some Hospitals in South-South Nigeria: African Journal of Biotechnology, 2008; 7(18):3178-3181.
5. Egbule OS, Antimicrobial resistance and B-lactamase production among Hospital Dumpsite isolates: Journal of Environmental Protection, 2016; 7:1057-1063 https://doi.org/10.4236/jep.2016.77094
6. Egbule OS, Detection and transfer of Extended Spectrum. Beta Lactamase Enzymes from Untreated Hospital waste Water: Advances in Microbiology, 2016; 6: 512-520 https://doi.org/10.4236/aim.2016.67051
7. Egbule OS, Yusuf, I, Multiple antibiotic Resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from cattle and poultry faeces in Abraka, south-south Nigeria: Tropical Agricultural Science, 2019; 42(2):585-594.
8. Iweriebor, BC, Egbule OS, Obi LC, The Emergence of Colistin-and Imipenem-Associated Multidrug Resistance in Isolates from Retail Meat: Polish Journal of Microbiology, 2022; 71(4):519-528 https://doi.org/10.33073/pjm-2022-046 PMid:36473114 PMCid:PMC9944967
9. Egbule OS, Occurrence of extended spectrum beta-lactamases and sul 1 in multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli and Salmonella isolated from poultry feeds: Scientific African, 2022; 18:2276- 2468 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sciaf.2022.e01362
10. Egbule OS, Occurrence of multidrug urinary tract isolates among pregnant women in Warri. Delta State: Journal of Applied Science, 2011; 14(3):10134-10145.
11. Babajide BO, Adeyemi J, Joshua B, Deciphering of microbial community and antibiotic resistance genes in activated sludge reactors under high selective pressure of different antibiotics: Water Research, 2018; 151(1):388-402. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2018.12.034 PMid:30616051
12. Kaambo E, Charlene WJ, The Threat of Aerobic Vaginitis to Pregnancy and Neonatal Morbidity: African Journal of Reproductive Health, 2017; 21(2):109-118. https://doi.org/10.29063/ajrh2017/v21i2.12
13. Sheiner E, Mazor-Drey E, Levy A, Asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy: Journal of Maternal Fetal and Neonatal Medicine, 2019; 22(1):423-427. https://doi.org/10.1080/14767050802360783 PMid:19530000
14. Akortha EE, Ibadin OK, Incidence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Staphylococcus aureus amongst patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) in UBTH Benin City, Nigeria: African Journal of Biotechnology, 2018; 7(1):1637-1640. https://doi.org/10.5897/AJB08.176
15. Top KA, Buet A, Whittier S, Ratner AJ, Saiman L, Predictors of Staphylococcus aureus rectovaginal colonization in pregnant women and risk for maternal and neonatal infections: Journal of Pediatric Infectious Disease Society, 2012; 1(1):7-15. https://doi.org/10.1093/jpids/pis001 PMid:23687569 PMCid:PMC3656550
16. Parveen K, Momen A, Begum AA, Begum M, Prevalence of urinary tract infection during pregnancy: Journal of Dhaka National Medical College, 2011; 17(1): 8-12. https://doi.org/10.3329/jdnmch.v17i2.12200
17. Stanley CN, Ugboma HA, Ibezim EC, Attama AA, Prevalence and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Staphylococcus Aureus and Other Staphylococcal Infections in Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinic in a Tertiary Hospital in Port Harcourt, Nigeria: Journal of Infection Diseases and Therapy, 2013; 1(1):125-130
18. Bronner S, Monteil H, Prévost G, Regulation of virulence determinants in Staphylococcus aureus: Complexity and applications: FEMS Microbiology Review, 2017; 28(1):183-200. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.femsre.2003.09.003 PMid:15109784
19. Shi L, Wang H, Lu Z, Staphylococcal Infection and Infertility: Intech Open, 2016; 25(1):159170. https://doi.org/10.5772/62663
20. Orji O, Dlamini Z, Wise AJ, Urinary bacterial profile and antibiotic susceptibility pattern among pregnant women in Rahima Moosa Mother and Child Hospital, Johannesburg: Southern African Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2021; 12(11):131-150. https://doi.org/10.4102/sajid.v37i1.343 PMid:35169587 PMCid:PMC8832018
21. Lewis DF, Robichaux AG, Jaekle RK, Marcum NG, Stedman CM, Urolithiasis in pregnancy: diagnosis, management, and pregnancy outcome: Obstetrics Gynecology Survey, 2015; 58(1):446-447. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.OGX.0000074323.48257.83
22. Arias CA, Murray BE, Enterococcus species, Streptococcus bovis group, and Leuconostoc species: In Mandell, G.L, Bennett, J.E. and Dolin, R. (editors). Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, 7th ed. 2019 Elsevier
23. Beksac AT, Orgulb G, Tanacanb A, Uckanb, Uropathogens and Gestational Outcomes of Urinary Tract Infections in Pregnancies that Necessitate Hospitalization: Current Urology, 2019; 13(1):70-73. https://doi.org/10.1159/000499290 PMid:31768172 PMCid:PMC6873071
24. Ibanez G, Blondel B, Prunet C, Kaminski M, Saurel-Cubizolles MJ, Prevalence and characteristics of women reporting poor mental health during pregnancy: findings from the 2010 French National Perinatal Survey: Review Epidemiology Sante Publique, 2019; 63(1):85-95. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.respe.2015.02.023 PMid:25841615
25. Singh S, Dey M, Singh S, Sasidharan S, Biochemical markers as a predictor of preterm labor- their clinical relevance and the current status: Gynecology Obstetric Reproduction Medicine, 2021; 9(1):1-8. https://doi.org/10.21613/GORM.2020.1108
26. Munita JM, Arias CA, Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance In: Virulence mechanisms of bacterial pathogens: Wiley, 2016; p. 481-511 https://doi.org/10.1128/9781555819286.ch17
27. Seliga-Siwecka JP, Kornacka MK, Neonatal outcome of preterm infants born to mothers with abnormal genital tract colonisation and chorioamnionitis: a cohort study: Early Human Development, 2013; 89(5): 271-275. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2012.10.003 PMid:23158015
28. Shi L, Wang H, Lu Z, Staphylococcal Infection and Infertility: IntechOpen, 2016; 25(1):159170. https://doi.org/10.5772/62663
Crossmark
Statistics
80 Views | 7 Downloads
How to Cite
1.
Egbule OS, Morka E, Omenogor PK. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus sp. Among Pregnant Women Attending General Hospitals in Delta Central Senatorial District, Nigeria. JDDT [Internet]. 15Mar.2024 [cited 19Apr.2024];14(3):22-6. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/6441