Antiinflammatory Lupeol and Antidiabetic Compound Coexist in Ethyl Acetate and n-Hexane Extracts from Stem Bark of Anogeissus leiocarpus (African Birch Tree): The Therapeutic Advantages

  • King Akpofure Nelson Esievo Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Agriculture, Zuru, Kebbi State, Nigeria.
  • Emmanuel Oluwadare Balogun Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.
  • John Wassagwa Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.
  • Kingsley Oghenerukevwe Esievo Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.
  • Lauretta Oghenekevwe Esievo Department of Theriogenology and Production, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.
  • Edith Monica Esievo Department of Veterinary Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Agriculture, Zuru, Kebbi State, Nigeria.
  • Dahiru Sani Department of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.
  • Edward Oniovosa Uyovbisere Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

Abstract

Objectives: Anogeissus leiocarpus stem bark is endowed with numerous antidiabetic properties, such as its prognostic value, treatment of organic damages, dyslipidaemia and enhancement of haematopoiesis. In addition to its antioxidant activity on oxidative stress, it accelerated wound healing and has a wide range of safety value. From the purification of its compounds to the points of crystallization it became necessary to analyse the structures for an insight into its mechanisms of actions.


Design: Ethanolic extracts were partitioned with ethyl acetate, onto column chromatography packed with silica gel (70-230 mesh) mixed with 95% n-hexane and 5% ethyl acetate; concentrated fractions were loaded onto silica gel-coated thin layer chromatographic plate. Different compounds were observed under UV-light fluorescence and sprayed with sulfuric acid. Similar fractions were pooled, purified to crystals for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance structural analysis.


Results: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance revealed fraction A is Lupeol, a pentacyclic triterpene anti-inflammatory compound.


Conclusion: Lupeol in the crude ethanolic extract is significant in inflammatory pain of diabetes.


Keywords: Lupeol, Anti-inflammatory, Anogeissus leiocarpus, Purified extract, inflammatory pain, Diabetes mellitus.

Keywords: Lupeol, Anti-inflammatory, Anogeissus leiocarpus, Purified extract, inflammatory pain, Diabetes mellitus

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Author Biographies

King Akpofure Nelson Esievo, Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Agriculture, Zuru, Kebbi State, Nigeria.

Lecturer/Resource Person, College of Veterinary Surgeons, Nigeria, Pathology Faculty, Samaru Zaria Study Centre, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

Consultant; Research and Diagnosis Unit, Kanesco Global Services Limited (RC829505) Hayin Mallam, Samaru, Zaria, Nigeria.

Emmanuel Oluwadare Balogun, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

African Centre of Excellence for Neglected Tropical Diseases and Forensic Biotechnology, (ACENTDFB), Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

John Wassagwa, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

UNESCO International Centre for Biotechnology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

Kingsley Oghenerukevwe Esievo, Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

Lauretta Oghenekevwe Esievo, Department of Theriogenology and Production, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

Department of Theriogenology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Agriculture, Zuru, Kebbi State, Nigeria.

Edith Monica Esievo, Department of Veterinary Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Agriculture, Zuru, Kebbi State, Nigeria.

Royal Veterinary College, University of London, Royal College Street, London NW1 OTU, United Kingdom.

Dahiru Sani, Department of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

Department of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

Edward Oniovosa Uyovbisere, Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

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Esievo KAN, Balogun EO, Wassagwa J, Esievo KO, Esievo LO, Esievo EM, Sani D, Uyovbisere EO. Antiinflammatory Lupeol and Antidiabetic Compound Coexist in Ethyl Acetate and n-Hexane Extracts from Stem Bark of Anogeissus leiocarpus (African Birch Tree): The Therapeutic Advantages. JDDT [Internet]. 15Jan.2024 [cited 25Feb.2024];14(1):121-6. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/6271

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