A Prospective Cohort Study on Diabetic Foot Infections with Emphasis on Identifiable Risk Factors in Patients Attending Tertiary Care Centre

  • Naresh Kunta Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, India -500014
  • Tulja Rani G Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, India -500014
  • Shravan Kumar Poludasari Pharm.D (Doctor of Pharmacy), Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, India -500014
  • Vidya Rachakonda Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, INDIA - 500014.
  • Lohitha Reddy Pingili Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, INDIA - 500014.

Abstract

Background: Foot infections are one of the most commonly observed complications in diabetic patients and are associated with high morbidity and risk of lower extremity amputation. Foot infections account for about 20% of all hospitalizations in people with diabetes and at least 50% of all non-traumatic lower-limb amputations performed annually.


Objective: To identify the risk factors in patients with diabetic foot infections attending tertiary care centre.


Method: It is a longitudinal prospective study in which patients attending the tertiary care centre with diabetic foot infections meeting the inclusion criteria were enrolled after obtaining the informed consent form.


Results and discussion: The results of this study revealed that the overall prevalence of DFI was seen more in males (61.42%) when compared to females (38.57%). The results also showed that the risk of DFI was more with trauma(44.28%) followed by the long duration of DM (28.57%) > wound (15.71%) > uncontrolled DM & prior foot ulcer (5.7%) which indicates a lack of awareness, longer duration of  DM, poor glycemic control were the main risk factors causing diabetic foot problems. Conclusion: The results suggest that lack of awareness, poor glycemic control, and long duration of diabetes were the main risk factors causing DFI. Therefore, efforts to prevent infections should be targeted at people with traumatic foot wounds especially those that are chronic and recurrent. Foot care education would be the foremost important way of dealing with this serious problem.


Keywords: Morbidity, lower-extremity amputation, trauma, glycemic control.

Keywords: Morbidity, lower-extremity amputation, trauma, glycemic control

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Naresh Kunta, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, India -500014

Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, India -500014

Tulja Rani G, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, India -500014

Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, India -500014

Shravan Kumar Poludasari, Pharm.D (Doctor of Pharmacy), Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, India -500014

Pharm.D (Doctor of Pharmacy), Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, India -500014

Vidya Rachakonda, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, INDIA - 500014.

Pharm.D (Doctor of Pharmacy), Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, India -500014

Lohitha Reddy Pingili, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, INDIA - 500014.

Pharm.D (Doctor of Pharmacy), Department of Pharmacy Practice, Malla Reddy Pharmacy College, Maisammaguda, Secunderabad, Telangana, India -500014

References

1. Principles of pharmacology by H.L. Sharma and K.K. Sharma, 3rd edition, para's medical publisher, 2017; 637-638.
2. Jetpack and K. park. Text book of preventive and social medicine, 17th edition, Bessarabia baton publishers, 2003; 294-296.
3. Essentials of medical pharmacology by KD. Tripathi,7th edition, Jaypee publisher, 2013; 258-259.
4. Masen S. Bader, MD, MPH, Memorial university of newfoundland school of medicine, Rt.Hon.'s, Canada. American Family Physician, 2008 July 1; 71-79.
5. Diabetic Foot Infections. Ashok Dammar MD, Foot Fellowship, Chicago, USA, Prediabetics Foot Specialist & Stem Cells Therapist, Chirag Enclave, New Delhi, India. JIMSA October - December 2011; 24(4).
6. Shaw JE, Boulton AJ. The pathogenesis of diabetic foot problems: an overview. Diabetes. 1997 Sep; 46 Suppl 2:S58-61. https://doi.org/10.2337/diab.46.2.S58
7. Cunha BA. Antibiotic selection for diabetic foot infections: a review. J Foot Ankle Surg. 2000 Jul-Aug; 39(4):253-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1067-2516(00)80009-5
8. Casemiro Juliana, Casemiro Janine, Alves C. Infections in patients with diabetes mellitus: A review of pathogenesis. Indian journal of endocrinology and metabolism. 2012 Mar; 16(Suppl1): S27. https://doi.org/10.4103/2230-8210.94253
9. The foot in diabetes by john Wiley and sons ltd,2006,chapter 12-Education in the Management of the Foot in Diabetes, by Kate Radford ,Susan Chipchase,William Jeffcoate , 143-158. https://doi.org/10.1002/0470029374.ch12
10. Williams DT, Hilton JR, Harding KG. Diagnosing foot infection in diabetes. Clin Infect Dis. 2004 Aug 1; 39 Suppl 2:S83-6. https://doi.org/10.1086/383267
11. The foot in diabetes by jhon wiley and sons ltd, 2006, chapter 5-The Pathway to Ulceration: Aetiopathogenesis by Andrew J. M. Boulton , 51-67. https://doi.org/10.1002/0470029374.ch5
12. Abdissa D, Adugna T, Gerema U, Dereje D. Prevalence of Diabetic Foot Ulcer and Associated Factors among Adult Diabetic Patients on Follow-Up Clinic at Jimma Medical Center, Southwest Ethiopia, 2019: An Institutional-Based Cross-Sectional Study. J Diabetes Res. 2020 Mar 15; 2020:4106383. https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/4106383
13. Marzoq A, Shiaa N, Zaboon R, Baghlany Q, Alabbood M, H: Assessment of the Outcome of Diabetic Foot Ulcers in Basrah, Southern Iraq: A Cohort Study. Int J Diabetes Metab 2019; 25:33-38. https://doi.org/10.1159/000500911
14. Boyko EJ, Ahroni JH, Stensel V, Forsberg RC, Davignon DR, Smith DG. A prospective study of risk factors for diabetic foot ulcer. The Seattle Diabetic Foot Study. Diabetes Care. 1999 Jul; 22(7):1036-42. https://doi.org/10.2337/diacare.22.7.1036
15. Lawrence A. Laver, David G. Armstrong, Robert P: Risk Factors for Foot Infections in Individuals With Diabetes : Diabetes Care 2006; 29:1288 -1293. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc05-2425
Statistics
37 Views | 3 Downloads
How to Cite
1.
Kunta N, G TR, Poludasari SK, Rachakonda V, Pingili LR. A Prospective Cohort Study on Diabetic Foot Infections with Emphasis on Identifiable Risk Factors in Patients Attending Tertiary Care Centre. JDDT [Internet]. 17Jun.2022 [cited 1Jul.2022];12(3-S):191-5. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/5360