Links between Leafstalk Biomass of (Cremastra appendiculata) and Elevation by Big Data of Long-time Wild Investigation in Mei-County

  • Bing-Hua Liao The Key Laboratory of Ecological Restoration in Hilly Areas, Forestry Department of Henan Province, Institute of chemistry and environmental engineering, Ping-ding-shan University, Ping-ding-shan City, 467000, China

Abstract

(Cremastra appendiculata) of treating lumbago and arthritis not only is a vital medicinal material plant, but also it is a widely distributed wide plant species. This plant species is widely distributed elevation from 500m to 3100m in forest landscapes and vegetation ecosystems in Mei County of China. However, understanding dynamics of biomass of leafstalk of this species is difficult along elevation. This research explained that the links between biomass of leafstalk of this species and elevation is the significant positive correlation from 500m to 1500m (P<0.01) as well as the links between biomass of leafstalk of this species and elevation are the significant negative correlation from 1500m to 3100m(P<0.01). This study provides six ecosystem types and a series of areas ecological adaptation for finding new medicinal species. Therefore, this study has vital theoretical and practical significance for medicinal plant protection along elevation and environments.


Keywords: biomass of leafstalk; elevation; correlation; areas ecological adaptation; medicinal species.

Keywords: biomass of leafstalk, elevation, correlation, areas ecological adaptation, medicinal species

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Author Biography

Bing-Hua Liao, The Key Laboratory of Ecological Restoration in Hilly Areas, Forestry Department of Henan Province, Institute of chemistry and environmental engineering, Ping-ding-shan University, Ping-ding-shan City, 467000, China

Institute of life and science, Henan University, Kai-feng City, He-nan Province, 475004, China

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1.
Liao B-H. Links between Leafstalk Biomass of (Cremastra appendiculata) and Elevation by Big Data of Long-time Wild Investigation in Mei-County. JDDT [Internet]. 15Dec.2020 [cited 21Jan.2021];10(6-s):55-0. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/4450