Antitoxic, Antifungal and Phytochemical Analysis of Medicinal Compounds of Guiera senegalensis Leaves

  • Z.M. Anka Department of Pharmacy, School of Allied Health Science, Sharda University, Greater Noida U.P, India
  • Vijender Singh Department of Pharmacy, School of Allied Health Science, Sharda University, Greater Noida U.P, India
  • S.N. Gimba School of General Studies, Shehu Sule College of Nursing and Midwifery, Damaturu, Yobe State, Nigeria
  • Gunjan Singh Department of Pharmacy, School of Allied Health Science, Sharda University, Greater Noida U.P, India

Abstract

Millions of people in the world depend on traditional medicinal plants for treatment of many diseases.  They have curative properties due to presence of various complex chemical substances of different composition, which are found as secondary plant metabolites in one or more parts of these plants. These plant metabolites according to their composition are grouped as flavonoids, tannins, alkaloids, saponins etc. Guiera senegalensis(Gs), which grows in abundance in semi-desert area of Western Africa such as Nigeria, has been used for treating specific diseases and wounds. The study is carried out to investigate the phytochemical analysis, toxicity, and the antifungal activity of Gs leaves extract.


Keywords: Guiera senegalensis, Antifungal activity, Brine shrimp, toxicity, phytochemical analysis;

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Author Biographies

Z.M. Anka, Department of Pharmacy, School of Allied Health Science, Sharda University, Greater Noida U.P, India

Department of Pharmacy, School of Allied Health Science, Sharda University, Greater Noida U.P, India

Vijender Singh, Department of Pharmacy, School of Allied Health Science, Sharda University, Greater Noida U.P, India

Department of Pharmacy, School of Allied Health Science, Sharda University, Greater Noida U.P, India

S.N. Gimba, School of General Studies, Shehu Sule College of Nursing and Midwifery, Damaturu, Yobe State, Nigeria

School of General Studies, Shehu Sule College of Nursing and Midwifery, Damaturu, Yobe State, Nigeria

Gunjan Singh, Department of Pharmacy, School of Allied Health Science, Sharda University, Greater Noida U.P, India

Department of Pharmacy, School of Allied Health Science, Sharda University, Greater Noida U.P, India

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Anka Z, Singh V, Gimba S, Singh G. Antitoxic, Antifungal and Phytochemical Analysis of Medicinal Compounds of Guiera senegalensis Leaves. JDDT [Internet]. 15Mar.2020 [cited 8Jul.2020];10(2):148-52. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/3932