Herbal antimicrobial gel with leaf extract of Cassia alata L.

  • Parbin Iraqui Department of Life Sciences, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh 786004 INDIA
  • Tapash Chakraborty Drug Delivery Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh 786004 INDIA
  • Malay K. Das Drug Delivery Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh 786004 INDIA
  • R.N.S Yadav Department of Life Sciences, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh 786004 INDIA

Abstract

Topical application of antimicrobials at the site of infection offer greater advantages as compared to systemic therapy. The present study reports for the first time, the in vivo wound healing potential of an herbal antimicrobial gel containing pure bioactive leaf extract of Cassia alata L. The methanolic leaf extract exhibited significant antibacterial and antifungal activity against the tested bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 9542) and fungi (Candida albicans MTCC 4842) due to the presence of alcohol and ketone containing bioactive moieties. A 1% (w/w) bioactive leaf extract based-hydrogel was formulated and evaluated for its wound healing potential in rat model with surgical site infection in the dorsal area. This herbal gel significantly enhanced the wound healing as assessed by the contraction of wound length and bio burden characteristics compared to the marketed antimicrobial formulations.  The formulated herbal gel could find use as very promising and innovative topical alternative for the treatment of skin infections caused by bacteria as well as fungal strains without hazard to human health based on the fact of its traditional use by the Assamese people with no toxic effects.   


Keywords: Cassia alata L.; methanolic leaf extracts; antimicrobial gel; antibacterial; antifungal; wound healing

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Author Biographies

Parbin Iraqui, Department of Life Sciences, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh 786004 INDIA

Department of Life Sciences, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh 786004 INDIA

Tapash Chakraborty, Drug Delivery Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh 786004 INDIA

Drug Delivery Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh 786004 INDIA

Malay K. Das, Drug Delivery Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh 786004 INDIA

Drug Delivery Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh 786004 INDIA

R.N.S Yadav, Department of Life Sciences, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh 786004 INDIA

Department of Life Sciences, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh 786004 INDIA

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Iraqui, P., Chakraborty, T., Das, M. K., & Yadav, R. (2019). Herbal antimicrobial gel with leaf extract of Cassia alata L. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 9(3), 82-94. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v9i3.2527