Psychologic Distress in Diabetic Patients

  • Rosmin Jacob Ph.D. scholar, Nims Institute of Pharmacy, Nims University Rajasthan, Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, St James College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chalakudy, Kerala, India.
  • Blessy Biju Pharm D, St James College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chalakudy, Kerala, India.
  • Rajesh Kumar Sharma Associate professor, Nims Institute of Pharmacy, Nims University Rajasthan., India.

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus presents a growing global health challenge, impacting millions and imposing significant burdens on individuals and healthcare systems alike. Diabetes distress encompasses the negative emotional impact of living with diabetes and holds significant clinical relevance, as it correlates with suboptimal self-care and glycemic control. This review explores the multifaceted relationship between diabetes and psychosocial factors, focusing on the concept of diabetes distress and its profound implications for patient well-being and disease management. As the prevalence of diabetes continues to rise, understanding and addressing the emotional toll of the condition becomes increasingly critical. Moreover, it explores the intricate dynamics of diabetes distress, self-care behaviors, and metabolic outcomes, emphasizing the importance of tailored interventions to alleviate distress and improve patient adherence and glycemic control. Greater diabetes distress correlates with detrimental medical and psychological outcomes, including suboptimal self-management behaviors such as reduced physical activity, unhealthy eating habits, medication non-adherence, and infrequent blood glucose monitoring. It's associated with elevated A1C levels, increased risk of severe hypoglycemia, and diminished quality of life. Identification of diabetes distress is crucial, with validated screening tools available to aid clinicians in this process. Various management strategies are outlined, ranging from psychological interventions to effective patient-provider communication and supportive group interventions. By integrating psychosocial care into diabetes management, healthcare professionals can better address the holistic needs of patients, ultimately enhancing their quality of life and overall well-being.


Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, psychological distress, Diabetic distress

Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, psychological distress, Diabetic distress

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Author Biographies

Rosmin Jacob, Ph.D. scholar, Nims Institute of Pharmacy, Nims University Rajasthan, Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, St James College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chalakudy, Kerala, India.

Ph.D. scholar, Nims Institute of Pharmacy, Nims University Rajasthan, Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, St James College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chalakudy, Kerala.

Blessy Biju, Pharm D, St James College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chalakudy, Kerala, India.

Pharm D, St James College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chalakudy, Kerala.

Rajesh Kumar Sharma, Associate professor, Nims Institute of Pharmacy, Nims University Rajasthan., India.

Associate professor, NIMS Institute of Pharmacy, NIMS University Rajasthan.

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Jacob R, Biju B, Sharma R. Psychologic Distress in Diabetic Patients. JDDT [Internet]. 15Jun.2024 [cited 17Jul.2024];14(6):247-50. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/6663