Prevalence of Malaria among Children in urban area at Byahi Health Center, Rubavu District, Rwanda

  • MUHAWENIMANA Marthe Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • ISHIMWE ALAIN PRUDENCE Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • NZABANTERURA Innocent Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • HABANABAKIZE Jean Baptiste Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • USENGIMANA Angelique Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda
  • UWIRINGIYIMANA Athanasie Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Abstract

Background: Malaria is one of the most public health and life-threatening parasitic infections caused by the protozoan parasite. Since children are immunologically naive to the malaria parasite, they are the main vulnerable groups to be affected by malaria.


Aim: This study aimed at determining the prevalence of malaria among children in urban area at Byahi Health Center, Rubavu district.


Methods: Cross-sectional study was used to achieve the objectives. To obtain the information regarding social demographic characteristics, written questionnaires in native language were distributed to caregivers. Blood smears were collected and sent to laboratory department for analysis. Data were analyzed using Statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS).


Results: Among 50 children who participated in the study, the majority were males over females with 58% and 42% respectively. The prevalence of malaria among children in urban area was higher with 30%. Among the participants, children of age range 1-5 years shown a high prevalence of malaria than those of 5-8 months with 13 and 2 positive cases respectively and children of 1-5 years old was statistically significant with a p-value (p 0.027).


Conclusion: After getting the results above, we have seen that children from urban area are affected by malaria with the overall prevalence of 30%. There is a need of improving and rechecking the existing malaria in children, prevention and control measures of the country. Byahi health center should create awareness about the importance early malaria checkup recommended reducing malaria infection. The parents are recommended to protect their children and district leaders should make researcher in others school. It must be reported to Ministry of Health that malaria infection mostly affects children.


Keywords: Malaria parasite, children, blood smear, Plasmodium

Keywords: Malaria parasite, children, blood smear, Plasmodium

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Author Biographies

MUHAWENIMANA Marthe, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

ISHIMWE ALAIN PRUDENCE, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

NZABANTERURA Innocent, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

HABANABAKIZE Jean Baptiste, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

USENGIMANA Angelique, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

UWIRINGIYIMANA Athanasie, Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda

Ines-Ruhengeri, Faculty of Applied Fundamental Sciences, Department of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Rwanda 

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1.
Marthe M, ALAIN PRUDENCE I, Innocent N, Baptiste H, Angelique U, Athanasie U. Prevalence of Malaria among Children in urban area at Byahi Health Center, Rubavu District, Rwanda. JDDT [Internet]. 15Jun.2024 [cited 17Jul.2024];14(6):121-4. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/6662

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