Evaluation of the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of Annona senegalensis Pers. (Annonaceae) leaves aqueous extract in rats and mice

  • Ignace KOUSSOUBE Laboratory of Life and Earth Sciences, Norbert ZONGO University, Koudougou, Burkina Faso
  • Filkpièrè Léonard Da Laboratory of Life and Earth Sciences, Norbert ZONGO University, Koudougou, Burkina Faso
  • Paténéma Sawadogo Applied Sciences and Technology Training Unit, Daniel-Ouezzin COULIBALY University, Dédougou, Burkina Faso
  • Basile Tindano Laboratory of Animal Physiology, Joseph Ki-ZERBO University, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.
  • Albert Soudré Laboratory of Life and Earth Sciences, Norbert ZONGO University, Koudougou, Burkina Faso
  • Balé Bayala Laboratory of Animal Physiology, Joseph Ki-ZERBO University, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

Abstract

Annona Senegalensis Pers. (Annonaceae) is a medicinal plant used to treat many pathologies, including inflammatory diseases and pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of Annona Senegalensis leaves aqueous extract in mice and rats. The analgesic activity was evaluated using the acetic acid (1%) induced writhing test and formalin (1%) test. The anti-inflammatory activity was performed using the carrageenan and the dextran induced hind paw oedema in rats.


The extract induced a significant (p<0.05) and dose-dependent decrease in abdominal contortions compared with control mice. The maximum inhibition was 63.36% at the dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. Only the late phase of formalin induced nociception was significantly inhibited by the extract with a maximum inhibition value of 56.96% at the dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. In the anti-inflammatory investigation, the aqueous extract of the leaves of Annona Senegalensis produced a significant (p<0.05) and dose-dependent decrease in edema induced by carrageenan and dextran. The maximum inhibition was 57.14% obtained at the fifth hour at the dose of 200mg/kg for the carrageenan test.  For the dextran test, the maximum inhibition was 59.80% obtained at the second hour at the dose of 200 mg/kg body weight.


 Our results show that Annona Senegalensis has peripheral analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. It could therefore be an advantage in alternative medicine.


Keywords: Analgesic, Anti-inflammatory, Annona Senegalensis, Rats, Mice

Keywords: Analgesic, Anti-inflammatory, Annona Senegalensis, Rats, Mice

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Author Biographies

Ignace KOUSSOUBE, Laboratory of Life and Earth Sciences, Norbert ZONGO University, Koudougou, Burkina Faso

Laboratory of Life and Earth Sciences, Norbert ZONGO University, Koudougou, Burkina Faso

Filkpièrè Léonard Da, Laboratory of Life and Earth Sciences, Norbert ZONGO University, Koudougou, Burkina Faso

Laboratory of Life and Earth Sciences, Norbert ZONGO University, Koudougou, Burkina Faso

Paténéma Sawadogo, Applied Sciences and Technology Training Unit, Daniel-Ouezzin COULIBALY University, Dédougou, Burkina Faso

Laboratory of Animal Physiology, Joseph Ki-ZERBO University, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

 

Basile Tindano, Laboratory of Animal Physiology, Joseph Ki-ZERBO University, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

Laboratory of Animal Physiology, Joseph Ki-ZERBO University, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

Albert Soudré, Laboratory of Life and Earth Sciences, Norbert ZONGO University, Koudougou, Burkina Faso

Laboratory of Life and Earth Sciences, Norbert ZONGO University, Koudougou, Burkina Faso

Balé Bayala, Laboratory of Animal Physiology, Joseph Ki-ZERBO University, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

Laboratory of Animal Physiology, Joseph Ki-ZERBO University, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

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KOUSSOUBE I, Da FL, Sawadogo P, Tindano B, Soudré A, Bayala B. Evaluation of the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of Annona senegalensis Pers. (Annonaceae) leaves aqueous extract in rats and mice. JDDT [Internet]. 15Jun.2024 [cited 17Jul.2024];14(6):23-0. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/6629