Qualitative Phytochemical Investigation and Acute Oral Toxicity Study on Ethanolic Extract of Curcuma longa Leaves

  • Pratima Chourasiya PG Student, Swami Vivekanand College of Pharmacy, Indore (M. P.), India
  • Rekha Gour Professor, Swami Vivekanand College of Pharmacy, Indore (M. P.), India
  • Anant K. Patel Professor, Swami Vivekanand College of Pharmacy, Indore (M. P.), India

Abstract

The study focused on evaluating the acute toxicity and phytochemical composition of Curcuma longa leaves using Swiss albino mice. The investigation involved a two-phase acute toxicity test, with doses up to 5000 mg/kg administered orally. The results indicated no toxicity at lower doses, while signs of weakness, salivation, and reduced movement were observed at 1600 mg/kg. Lethal effects were noted at 5000 mg/kg, establishing the LD50 at 2154.06 mg/kg. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, glycosides, tannins, and volatile oils in the ethanolic extract. The extract exhibited a 27.37% yield, characterized by a yellowish-orange color and a sticky consistency. This comprehensive investigation sheds light on both the acute toxicity profile and the diverse phytochemical components presents in Curcuma longa leaves.


Keywords: Curcuma longa, Phytoconstituent, Acute oral toxicity, Lokes method.

Keywords: Curcuma longa, Phytoconstituent, Acute oral toxicity, Lokes method

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Author Biographies

Pratima Chourasiya, PG Student, Swami Vivekanand College of Pharmacy, Indore (M. P.), India

PG Student, Swami Vivekanand College of Pharmacy, Indore (M. P.), India

Rekha Gour, Professor, Swami Vivekanand College of Pharmacy, Indore (M. P.), India

Professor, Swami Vivekanand College of Pharmacy, Indore (M. P.), India

Anant K. Patel, Professor, Swami Vivekanand College of Pharmacy, Indore (M. P.), India

Professor, Swami Vivekanand College of Pharmacy, Indore (M. P.), India

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1.
Chourasiya P, Gour R, Patel AK. Qualitative Phytochemical Investigation and Acute Oral Toxicity Study on Ethanolic Extract of Curcuma longa Leaves. JDDT [Internet]. 15Jan.2024 [cited 25Feb.2024];14(1):73-8. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/6244