Design, Development and Characterization of Hyaluronic Acid Based pH Sensitive Liposomal In Situ Gel for the Treatment of Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca

  • S Nagalakshmi Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India. https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8657-2103
  • Suthahar Teshini Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.
  • E Shoba Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.
  • Shyam Madhavan Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.
  • Suresh Shilpa Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.
  • S. Sintinya Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.

Abstract

The recent advances in ocular drug delivery have been successful in surpassing conventional therapy, owing to its considerable limitations. This study aims to develop and optimize in-situ liposomal ocular system to design once-daily liquid preparation to treat Keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Liposomes of Hyaluronic acid were prepared using soya lecithin by a thin film hydration method.  Eight trial formulations were made by keeping drug as fixed ratio and varying the concentration of cholesterol and soya lecithin. The optimized formulation was selected for the formulation of liposomal in-situ hydrogel. Optimization was carried out by Central Composite Design (CCD) studying the factors, amount of cholesterol and soya lecithin and its effects on the responses, % In- vitro drug release (R1) and Percent Entrapment Efficiency (% EE) (R2). The best predicted model for R1 was the Quadratic model and, for R2 was Two-Factor Interaction model (2FI) without any significant lack of fit. Optimum formulation was found to be at 1:1:4 (drug: cholesterol: soya lecithin) showed sustained drug release of 31.28% in 8 hours with highest %EE of 47.36%. Liposomal in-situ gel preparation retained better stability throughout the study period when stored at refrigerator temperature and displayed prolonged action (76.44%) when compared to liposomal formulation (68.72%).


Keywords: Liposomes, Hyaluronic acid, Optimized formulation, CCD, sustained drug release, in-situ hydrogel.

Keywords: Liposomes, Hyaluronic acid, Optimized formulation, CCD, sustained drug release, in-situ hydrogel

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Author Biographies

S Nagalakshmi, Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.

Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.

Suthahar Teshini, Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.

Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.

E Shoba, Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.

Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.

Shyam Madhavan, Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.

Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.

Suresh Shilpa, Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.

Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.

S. Sintinya, Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.

Department of Pharmaceutics, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER(DU), Porur, Chennai, India-600116, Tamilnadu, India.

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Nagalakshmi S, Teshini S, Shoba E, Madhavan S, Shilpa S, Sintinya S. Design, Development and Characterization of Hyaluronic Acid Based pH Sensitive Liposomal In Situ Gel for the Treatment of Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca. JDDT [Internet]. 15Jan.2023 [cited 27Jan.2023];13(1):17-5. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/5888