Pharmacognostical, Phytochemical Screening and Evaluation of Anxiolytic activity of Alcoholic Extract of Withania somnifera (L) Dunal Roots

  • Umesh Chandra Pandey Research Scholar, Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam University, Indore (M.P.), India
  • Karunakar Shukla Professor & Principal, College of Pharmacy, Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam University, Indore (M.P.), India
  • Rakesh Kumar Jatav Professor, College of Pharmacy, Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam University, Indore (M.P.), India

Abstract

The roots of Withania somnifera (L) Dunal (W. somnifera) are used extensively in Ayurveda, the classical Indian system of medicine, and W. somnifera is categorized as a rasayana, which are used to promote physical and mental health, to provide defense against disease and adverse environmental factors and to arrest the aging process. W. somnifera has been used to stabilize mood in patients with behavioural disturbances. The objective of this study was to investigate pharmacognostical, phytochemical features and anxiolytic activity of alcoholic extracts of W. somnifera roots. The various pharmacognostical variables were assessed using generally accepted techniques with certain variations. An established test technique that is documented in the literature was used to determine the qualitative analysis of different phytochemical elements. The anxiolytic efficacy of the alcoholic extract of W. somnifera roots in mice was evaluated using the elevated plus maze test (EPMT), light and dark test (L and DT), and open field test (OFT). Extract dosages of 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg were compared to the recommended dosage of diazepam (1 mg/kg) to determine its efficacy. Alcoholic extract underwent phytochemical examination, which identified the presence of fixed oils, lipids, proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates, tannins, and phenolics. The percentage of time spent and the number of entries in the open arm in EPMT were both considerably enhanced by the alcoholic extract of W. somnifera roots (250, 500, 750mg/kg, p.o.). The extract significantly increased time spent, the frequency of crossings, and decreased the length of immobility in the light box in L and DT. The extract in OFT significantly increased the number of rearings, increased ambulation, and decreased self-grooming and faecal dropping all signs of exploratory behaviour. The findings of the current investigation provide scientific support for the traditional use of W. somnifera by indicating that an alcoholic extract of its roots may have anxiolytic properties.


Keywords: Anxiolytic, Withania somnifera (L) Dunal, Elevated plus maze, Open field test, Light and dark test

Keywords: Anxiolytic, Withania somnifera (L) Dunal, Elevated plus maze, Open field test, Light and dark test

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Author Biographies

Umesh Chandra Pandey, Research Scholar, Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam University, Indore (M.P.), India

Research Scholar, Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam University, Indore (M.P.), India

Karunakar Shukla, Professor & Principal, College of Pharmacy, Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam University, Indore (M.P.), India

Professor & Principal, College of Pharmacy, Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam University, Indore (M.P.), India

Rakesh Kumar Jatav, Professor, College of Pharmacy, Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam University, Indore (M.P.), India

Professor, College of Pharmacy, Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam University, Indore (M.P.), India

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Pandey UC, Shukla K, Jatav RK. Pharmacognostical, Phytochemical Screening and Evaluation of Anxiolytic activity of Alcoholic Extract of Withania somnifera (L) Dunal Roots. JDDT [Internet]. 15May2023 [cited 14Apr.2024];13(5):29-4. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/5806