To establish bioequivalence of 50mg Metoprolol Succinate extended release tablets in normal, healthy, adult, human subject under fasting condition

  • Mahavir Singh Geetanjali Institute of Pharmacy (Geetanjali University) Udaipur (Rajasthan), India
  • Lalit Singh Ranawat Geetanjali Institute of Pharmacy (Geetanjali University) Udaipur (Rajasthan), India

Abstract

Oral drug delivery is the most preferred route for the various drug molecules among all other routes of drug delivery, because ease of administration which lead to better patient compliance. So, oral extended release drug delivery system becomes a very promising approach for those drugs that are given orally but having the shorter half-life and high dosing frequency. Extended release Extended-release systems allow for the drug to be released over prolonged time periods. By extending the release profile of a drug, the frequency of dosing can be reduced. The study was an open label, balanced, randomized, three-treatment, three-period, three-sequence, single oral dose, crossover, bioequivalence study in normal healthy adult human subjects under fasting condition, with a screening period of 28 days prior to IMP administration in Period-I. In each study period, 27 blood samples, including one pre-dose blood sample, were collected from each subject except for the discontinued / withdrawn subjects to analyze the pharmacokinetic profile of the two test products (T1 and T2) as well as the reference product. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated from the plasma concentration vs. time profile by non-compartmental model using Phoenix® WinNonlin® Version 6.4 (Certara L.P.) for Metoprolol. Out of 18 subjects enrolled, data of 13 subjects were analyzed. Mean Cmax is 31.634 ± 22.6007 ng/mL, 31.241 ± 20.6090 ng/mL and 31.773 ± 23.1819 ng/mL, mean AUCo-t is722.992 ± 584.3793 ng hr/mL, 658.192 ± 492.3416 ng hr/mL and 706.219 ± 546.5064 ng hr/mL, mean AUC0-inf is 751.204 ± 631.9623 ng hr/mL, 676.939 ± 519.1306 ng hr/mL and729.505 ± 578.1691 ng hr/mL for test product (T1), test product (T2) and reference product (R).Test Products (T1 and T2) when compared with the Reference Product-R meets the bioequivalence criteria with respect to Cmax, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ for Metoprolol under fasting condition as per criteria set in the protocol.

Keywords: Metoprolol, Extended-release systems, Pharmacokinetic parameters, Bioequivalence, Non-compartmental model

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Author Biographies

Mahavir Singh, Geetanjali Institute of Pharmacy (Geetanjali University) Udaipur (Rajasthan), India
Geetanjali Institute of Pharmacy (Geetanjali University) Udaipur (Rajasthan), India
Lalit Singh Ranawat, Geetanjali Institute of Pharmacy (Geetanjali University) Udaipur (Rajasthan), India
Geetanjali Institute of Pharmacy (Geetanjali University) Udaipur (Rajasthan), India

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Singh M, Ranawat LS. To establish bioequivalence of 50mg Metoprolol Succinate extended release tablets in normal, healthy, adult, human subject under fasting condition. JDDT [Internet]. 15Jan.2021 [cited 28Sep.2021];11(1):48-9. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/4497