Bioinformatic Approaches for Identification of Potential Repurposable Drugs in COVID-19

  • Manisha Mandal Department of Physiology, MGM Medical College, Kishanganj-855107, India
  • Shyamapada Mandal Laboratory of Microbiology and Experimental Medicine, Department of Zoology, University of Gour Banga, Malda-732103, India

Abstract

Introduction: Repurposing existing drugs approved for other conditions is crucial to identifying specific therapeutics against SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) causing COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic. Towards this attempt, it is important to understand how this virus hijacks the host system during the course of infection and determine potential virus- and host-targeted inhibitors.


Methods: This study elucidates the underlying virus-host interaction based on differentially expressed gene profiling, functional enrichment and pathway analysis, protein-protein and protein-drug interactions utilizing the information on transcriptional response to SARS-CoV-2 infection from GSE147507 dataset containing COVID-19 case relative to healthy control and infected cell culture compared to uninfected one.


Results: Low IFN signaling, chemokines level elevation, and proinflammatory cytokines release were observed markedly. We identified MYC-rapamycin and ABCG2-rapamycin interactions, and unique gene signatures in case (regulation of protein modification and MAPK signaling) as well as in cell (metabolic dysregulation and interferon signaling) different from known COVID-19 genes.


Conclusion: Among a plethora of repurposable drugs those appearing here with unique gene signatures might be helpful in COVID-19


Keywords: COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, GSE 147507 dataset, protein-protein interaction, gene-drug interaction, repurposable drugs.

Keywords: COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, GSE 147507 dataset, protein-protein interaction, gene-drug interaction, repurposable drugs

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Author Biographies

Manisha Mandal, Department of Physiology, MGM Medical College, Kishanganj-855107, India

Department of Physiology, MGM Medical College, Kishanganj-855107, India

Shyamapada Mandal, Laboratory of Microbiology and Experimental Medicine, Department of Zoology, University of Gour Banga, Malda-732103, India

Laboratory of Microbiology and Experimental Medicine, Department of Zoology, University of Gour Banga, Malda-732103, India

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1.
Mandal M, Mandal S. Bioinformatic Approaches for Identification of Potential Repurposable Drugs in COVID-19. JDDT [Internet]. 15Jan.2021 [cited 18May2021];11(1):13-2. Available from: https://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/4472