ADME-Tox profile of Cuminaldehyde (4-Isopropylbenzaldehyde) from Cuminum cyminum seeds for potential biomedical applications

  • S. Ramya PG Department of Zoology, Yadava College (Men), Thiruppalai - 625014, Madurai, TamilNadu, India
  • T. Loganathan Department of Plant Biology & Plant Biotechnology, LN Government College (A), Ponneri, TN, India
  • M. Chandran Department of Zoology, Thiruvalluvar University, Serkadu, Vellore-632 115, TamilNadu, India
  • R. Priyanka Department of Zoology, Thiruvalluvar University, Serkadu, Vellore-632 115, TamilNadu, India
  • K. Kavipriya Department of Zoology, Arignar Anna Government Arts College (W), Walajapet-632 513, TN, India
  • G. Lydial Grace Lydial Pushpalatha PG Department of Botany, Sri Meenakshi Government Arts College, Madurai-625002, TN, India
  • Devaraj Aruna Rajendra Herbal Research Training Centre, Tamaraikulam, Periyakulam, Theni District, TN, India
  • GC. Abraham PG & Research Department of Botany, The American College, Madurai – 625002, TamilNadu, India
  • R. Jayakumararaj Department of Botany, Government Arts College, Melur – 625106, Madurai, TamilNadu, India

Abstract

Cuminum cyminum L (Family: Apiaceae) is a small multipurpose herb. Seeds of cumin are widely used as a spice for its distinctive aroma, and more commonly in various indigenous traditional systems of medicine. Access through web literature provides ample evidence for biomedical activities of Cuminum cyminum seeds (CCS). CCS has been used in traditional medicine to treat variety of diseases, including hypolipidemia, cancer, and diabetes. Biomedical properties of CCS is attributed to its phytochemical class of compounds viz., terpenes, phenols and flavonoids. Health effects of CCS have been experimentally validated through phytochemical screening deciphering the fact that it contains a large number of bioactive secondary metabolites (BASMs) viz., alkaloid, coumarin, anthraquinones, flavonoid, glycoside, protein, resin, saponin, tannin and steroid. Furthermore, pharmacological studies indicate that BASMs in CCS exert antimicrobial, insecticidal, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antioxidant, anticancer, antidiabetic, anti-platelet-aggregation, hypotensive, bronchodilatory, immunological, contraceptive, anti-amyloidogenic, anti-osteoporotic, aldose reductase, α-glucosidase and tyrosinase inhibitory effects. Cuminaldehyde is one of the major bioactive compounds in CCS that holds significant pharmacological prominence. However, in-depth studies are lacking henceforth warranted to elucidate and fill the gaps, particularly on phytocompound isolation, pre-clinical, clinical characterization, and evaluation of structure–activity relationship. The present study prospects ADMETox perspectives of cuminaldehyde (4-Isopropylbenzaldehyde).


Keywords: Cuminaldehyde; Isopropylbenzaldehyde; Cuminum cyminum; ADMETox; Natural Product (NP)

Keywords: Cuminaldehyde, Isopropylbenzaldehyde, Cuminum cyminum, ADMETox, Natural Product (NP)

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Author Biographies

S. Ramya, PG Department of Zoology, Yadava College (Men), Thiruppalai - 625014, Madurai, TamilNadu, India

PG Department of Zoology, Yadava College (Men), Thiruppalai - 625014, Madurai, TamilNadu, India

T. Loganathan, Department of Plant Biology & Plant Biotechnology, LN Government College (A), Ponneri, TN, India

Department of Plant Biology & Plant Biotechnology, LN Government College (A), Ponneri, TN, India

M. Chandran, Department of Zoology, Thiruvalluvar University, Serkadu, Vellore-632 115, TamilNadu, India

Department of Zoology, Thiruvalluvar University, Serkadu, Vellore-632 115, TamilNadu, India

R. Priyanka, Department of Zoology, Thiruvalluvar University, Serkadu, Vellore-632 115, TamilNadu, India

Department of Zoology, Thiruvalluvar University, Serkadu, Vellore-632 115, TamilNadu, India

K. Kavipriya, Department of Zoology, Arignar Anna Government Arts College (W), Walajapet-632 513, TN, India

Department of Zoology, Arignar Anna Government Arts College (W), Walajapet-632 513, TN, India

G. Lydial Grace Lydial Pushpalatha, PG Department of Botany, Sri Meenakshi Government Arts College, Madurai-625002, TN, India

PG Department of Botany, Sri Meenakshi Government Arts College, Madurai-625002, TN, India

Devaraj Aruna, Rajendra Herbal Research Training Centre, Tamaraikulam, Periyakulam, Theni District, TN, India

Rajendra Herbal Research Training Centre, Tamaraikulam, Periyakulam, Theni District, TN, India

GC. Abraham, PG & Research Department of Botany, The American College, Madurai – 625002, TamilNadu, India

PG & Research Department of Botany, The American College, Madurai – 625002, TamilNadu, India

R. Jayakumararaj, Department of Botany, Government Arts College, Melur – 625106, Madurai, TamilNadu, India

Department of Botany, Government Arts College, Melur – 625106, Madurai, TamilNadu, India

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Ramya S, Loganathan T, Chandran M, Priyanka R, Kavipriya K, Grace Lydial Pushpalatha G, Aruna D, Abraham G, Jayakumararaj R. ADME-Tox profile of Cuminaldehyde (4-Isopropylbenzaldehyde) from Cuminum cyminum seeds for potential biomedical applications. JDDT [Internet]. 15Apr.2022 [cited 2Jul.2022];12(2-S):127-41. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/5286

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