A Comparative Research between Pharmacological and Non-Pharmacological Profile of Anti-Hyperlipidemic Activity on Rodents

Abstract

The condition of hyperlipidemia is found to be a great establisher for all the negative health consequences which may lead to cardiac complications. Continuous usage of medication alone is not permanent remedy but also need physical exercise. The same situation was established in animals to assess the performance of pharmacological and non-pharmacological profile by standardized screening using In-vivo methods. The high-cholesterol diet caused a significant increase in total lipids, total cholesterol (TC), total triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and the atherogenic index, whereas the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly decreased for the treatment groups intended for physical exercise. This article enables the importance of health benefited by physical performance by depicting the biochemical parameters.


Keywords: Hyperlipidemia, Triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, activity wheel, Physical exercise, Cardiac performance.

Keywords: Hyperlipidemia, Triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein, activity wheel, Physical exercise, Cardiac performance

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Author Biographies

Darsi Eswar Tony, Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chalapathi Nagar, Lam, Guntur, 522034, India

Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chalapathi Nagar, Lam, Guntur, 522034, India

M. Uday Kiran, Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India

Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India

Md. Abu Saleha, Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India

Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India

R. Suresh Naik, Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India

Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India

U. Bhargav Sai, Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India

Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India

V. Niranjan, Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India

Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India

T. Kowshik, Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India

Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India

Rama Rao Nadendla, Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India

Chalapathi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India

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1.
Tony DE, Kiran MU, Saleha MA, Naik RS, Sai UB, Niranjan V, Kowshik T, Nadendla RR. A Comparative Research between Pharmacological and Non-Pharmacological Profile of Anti-Hyperlipidemic Activity on Rodents. JDDT [Internet]. 15Sep.2021 [cited 18Oct.2021];11(5):65-0. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/5016