In Silico Identification of Flavonoids from Corriandrum sativum Seeds against Coronavirus Covid-19 Main Protease

  • G Suresh Kumar Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Excel College of Pharmacy, Komarapalayam, India
  • R. Manivannan Excel College of Pharmacy, Komarapalayam, India
  • B. Nivetha Department Of Pharmacy Practice, Excel College of Pharmacy, Komarapalayam, India

Abstract

Molecular docking analysis is routinely used in modern drug research to understand and predict the relationship between a drug molecule and a target protein from a microbe. The entry and replication of pathogens in host cells can be prevented by drugs identified in this way. The coronavirus disease associated with SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, has become today's most infectious and lethal pandemic disease in the world. Burgeoning in the absence of any particular vaccine or therapeutic agent against SARS-CoV-2.The situation urges the need for appropriate medications to treat patients infected with the virus. Consequently, the study focus on evaluate the therapeutic potential of flavonoids present in Corriandrum sativum seeds that could serve as suitable remedies for COVID19.We analyzed the binding affinity of four flavonoids were screened against Mpro protein of SARS-CoV-2 by PyRx Virtual Screening tool and also results are validated with Lig-Plot Plus. Lopinavir shows binding affinity of -8.3 Kcal/mol and exhibit stable, strong interaction with active site of COVID19 main protease. Besides flavonoids, Rutin found to have the highest binding affinity compared to Lopinavir with the Mpro protease, followed by Chlorogenic acid, Quercetin and Caffeic acid. The present study concludes that Rutin present in the integrant of seeds shows the highest potentiality for acting as in inhibitor of main protease enzyme. Further, characterization of the amino acid residues comprising the viral binding site and the nature of the hydrogen bonding involved in the ligand receptor interaction shows significant findings with Rutin binding to the MPro protein at  amino acid. The amino acid acid present in active sites of Mpro protease responsible for virus pathogenicity. The findings of the present study need in vivo experiments to prove the utility of Rutin compounds and further use in making Corriandrum sativum seeds as anti-SARS-CoV-2 product in near future.


Keywords: Corriandrum sativum seeds,Novel Coronavirus, SARS-CoV2, COVID-19, Protease, Molecular Docking.

Keywords: Corriandrum sativum seeds, Novel Coronavirus, SARS-CoV2, COVID-19, Protease, Molecular Docking

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Author Biographies

G Suresh Kumar, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Excel College of Pharmacy, Komarapalayam, India

Associate Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Excel College of Pharmacy, Komarapalayam, India

R. Manivannan, Excel College of Pharmacy, Komarapalayam, India

Professor & Principal, Excel College of Pharmacy, Komarapalayam, India

B. Nivetha, Department Of Pharmacy Practice, Excel College of Pharmacy, Komarapalayam, India

Assistant Professor, Department Of Pharmacy Practice, Excel College of Pharmacy, Komarapalayam, India

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Suresh Kumar G, Manivannan R, Nivetha B. In Silico Identification of Flavonoids from Corriandrum sativum Seeds against Coronavirus Covid-19 Main Protease. JDDT [Internet]. 15Mar.2021 [cited 20Apr.2021];11(2):145-52. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/4610