A Review on Pediatric Adverse Effects of First Line Anti-Tubercular Drugs

  • ATHULNADH B Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India
  • K. Sreejith Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India
  • K.V. Musaina Thasneem Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India
  • Namitha Maniyan Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India
  • P.P. Muhamed Faris Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India
  • Cherakkulath C Neena Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India

Abstract

Tuberculosis is a potentially serious communicable disease caused by mycobacterium tuberculosis. That mainly affects lungs. Tricky mitigation and diagnosis cause the childhood tuberculosis a growing burden for society. Directly Observed Treatment Short course (DOTS) strategy is one of the largest public health programmes found to be beneficial against tuberculosis. Anti-tubercular treatment shows greater level of efficacy high degree of toxicity; however combination treatment, especially during the intensive phase of therapy may produce severe adverse events. First line therapy of Tuberculosis leads to serious adverse effects. Serious adverse effects are less in children receiving drug therapy. Major adverse event associated with anti TB drugs is hepatotoxicity.


Keywords: Tuberculosis, DOTS, isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, ethambutol and streptomycin

Keywords: Tuberculosis, DOTS, isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, ethambutol and streptomycin

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Author Biographies

ATHULNADH B, Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India

Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India

K. Sreejith, Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India

Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India

K.V. Musaina Thasneem, Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India

Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India

Namitha Maniyan, Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India

Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India

P.P. Muhamed Faris, Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India

Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India

Cherakkulath C Neena, Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India

Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, 673008, India

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1.
B A, Sreejith K, Thasneem K, Maniyan N, Faris P, Neena C. A Review on Pediatric Adverse Effects of First Line Anti-Tubercular Drugs. JDDT [Internet]. 15Nov.2020 [cited 26Nov.2020];10(6):216-8. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/4544