Evaluation of Phytocompounds and Chemical Elements Present In Selected Species of Seaweeds, to Sustain Future Quantitative Analysis for Bioactive Compounds

  • Valera Dias Department of Biological Sciences, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique
  • Salomão Bandeira Department of Biological Sciences, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique
  • Eutilério Chaúque Department of Chemistry, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique
  • Maurício Lipassula Department of Biological Sciences, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique
  • Aidate Mussagy Department of Biological Sciences, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique

Abstract

Introduction: The specific physiological capacity of marine organisms, including seaweeds, to survive in extreme environmental conditions is associated to the production of secondary metabolites. Seaweeds are known as powerful source of a broad range of bioactive compounds. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the phytocompounds and chemical elements present in eight species of seaweeds which occur around Inhaca Island, Mozambique. Specifically, Halimeda cuneata, Pseudorhizoclonium africanum, Pseudocodium devriesii, Dictyota suhrii, Gracilaria salicornia, Hypnea rosea, Laurencia natalensis and Jania adhaerens. Methods: For phytocompounds and chemical elements screening, seaweeds samples were dried, ground to powder and extracted using methanol as solvent. The analyses were performed using GC-MS analysis, Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence, and colorimetric protocols for phytocompound analysis. Results: A total of 82 phytocompounds were identified. Phytol and Z-8-Methyl-9-tetradecenoic were present in all samples analysed, while Cetene, 9-Octadecenoic acid (Z)-methyl ester, Desmoterol, Octadecanoic acid, and Oleic acid were the less common phytocompound identified. Campesterol, gama-Sitoesterol, Cholest-5-en-ol, 24-propylidene-(3.beta) are phytosterols only identified in green seaweeds. The concentration of chemical elements among the seaweeds species was different. However, Ca, Cl and K were presented in high concentration in some of the seaweeds analysed. Conclusion: Overall, the seaweeds analysed in this study, seems to be good candidate for further biotechnological application and deserve further investigation.


Keywords: seaweeds, methanolic extracts, phytocompounds, minerals, Inhaca Island.

Keywords: seaweeds, methanolic extracts, phytocompounds, minerals, Inhaca Island

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Author Biographies

Valera Dias, Department of Biological Sciences, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique

Department of Biological Sciences, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique

Salomão Bandeira, Department of Biological Sciences, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique

Department of Biological Sciences, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique

Eutilério Chaúque, Department of Chemistry, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique

Department of Chemistry, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique

Maurício Lipassula, Department of Biological Sciences, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique

Department of Biological Sciences, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique

Aidate Mussagy, Department of Biological Sciences, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique

Department of Biological Sciences, Eduardo Mondlane University, Maputo, Mozambique

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Dias V, Bandeira S, Chaúque E, Lipassula M, Mussagy A. Evaluation of Phytocompounds and Chemical Elements Present In Selected Species of Seaweeds, to Sustain Future Quantitative Analysis for Bioactive Compounds. JDDT [Internet]. 15Sep.2020 [cited 25Sep.2020];10(5):232-9. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/4422