Identification and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus 16S rRNA gene isolated from different Food Specimens from South Indian Region

  • Mondeddu Kiran Kumar Department of Biotechnology & Microbiology, School of Sciences, Noida International University-NIU, GautamBudh Nagar-201308, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • Charu Tyagi Department of Biotechnology, VSPG(PG) College, CCS University, Meerut-250004, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • Arjun Sahu Department of Biotechnology & Microbiology, School of Sciences, Noida International University-NIU, GautamBudh Nagar-201308, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • Nalini Desai Department of Zoology, TheAdoni Arts and Science College, Adoni, Kurnool, Andhra Pradesh, India.
  • Jayanand Manjhi Noida International University-NIU, GautamBudh Nagar-201308, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • Kakarla Chandra Mohan Department of Zoology, KVR Government Degree College for Women, Kurnool, Andhra Pradesh, India
  • Yugandhar P. Reddy Department of Zoology, TheAdoni Arts and Science College, Adoni, Kurnool, Andhra Pradesh, India.
  • Santosh Kumar Tiwari Centre for Liver Research and Diagnostics, Deccan College of Medical Sciences, Kanchanbagh,Hyderabad 500 058, Telangana, India.
  • Lomas Kumar Tomar Department of Biotechnology & Microbiology, School of Sciences, Noida International University-NIU, GautamBudh Nagar-201308, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • Varun Kumar Sharma Department of Biotechnology & Microbiology, School of Sciences, Noida International University-NIU, GautamBudh Nagar-201308, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) associated food-borne diseases have global impact on human health. Genome wide analyses have shown that S. aureus contains specific endotoxin expressing gene and produce toxic proteins which is responsible for food contamination. Appropriate detection of pathogens is one of the major tool to avoid infection rate and reduce the health and socio-economic burden to human being. In addition, inappropriate handing the specimens, misdiagnosis and limited standard medical support could directly influence the infection rate.


The objective of this study was to identify S. aureus from different food specimens from Hyderabad, India. A total of 70 random bacterial nutrient agar medium pure plates were made based on different morphological appearance of bacterial colonies. Preliminary identification of S. aureus based on standardized morphological method showed specific golden yellow colonies. Biochemical assay also verified bacterial specimens. Furthermore, molecular characterization was performed on the basis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene of S. aureus. Newly sequenced 16S rRNA gene sequences showed 100% homology to S. aureus, analyzed using NCBI-BLAST tool.


The phylogenetic analysis and nucleotide base composition studies performed using 39 sequences of 16S rRNA gene from different isolates of Staphylococcus, including Staphylococcus aureus. For the purpose, 16S rRNA gene sequences were retrieved from the NCBI in FASTA format. The phylogenetic analysis was performed using Maximum Likelihood method and revealed the relationships and percent similarity of Staphylococcus aureus 16S rRNA gene.


Keywords: Food-borne diseases; 16S rRNA gene; Maximum Likelihood; Phylogenetic analysis; Staphylococcus aureus.

Keywords: Food-borne diseases, 16S rRNA gene, Maximum Likelihood, Phylogenetic analysis, Staphylococcus aureus

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Kiran Kumar M, Tyagi C, Sahu A, Desai N, Manjhi J, Mohan KC, Reddy YP, Tiwari SK, Tomar LK, Sharma VK. Identification and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus 16S rRNA gene isolated from different Food Specimens from South Indian Region. JDDT [Internet]. 15Sep.2020 [cited 25Sep.2020];10(5):24-2. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/4340