Evaluating the effect of the porous and non-porous colloidal silicon dioxide as a stabilizer on amorphous solid dispersion

  • Smruti P. Chaudhari Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, 11201, USA
  • Mittal Bhadiyadra Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, 11201, USA
  • Rutesh H. Dave Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, 11201, USA

Abstract

Advancement in the discovery of drugs has led to many highly lipophilic compounds with very low water solubility. Amorphous solid dispersion is one of the emerging technologies to increase the solubility of these drugs. The stability of these systems is critical since the high energy system tends to recrystallize, which negates the benefits of these systems. In this paper, we are evaluating the use of colloidal silicon dioxide as a potential stabilizer to stabilize the amorphous solid dispersions. Two types of colloidal silicon dioxide are used: porous colloidal silicon dioxide -Syloid 244 Fp and nonporous fumed silica – Aerosil 200. These silicon dioxides have a high surface area. Two methods of incorporation are used to incorporate silicon dioxide into the solid dispersion. The spray drying method is used to make amorphous solid dispersion. It was found that porous silicon dioxide is better to increase stability as well as increasing dissolution rate and % release of the drug. The addition of silicon dioxide internally to the dispersion increases the dissolution rate, and the addition of silicon dioxide externally increases the stability of the solid dispersion.


Keywords: colloidal silicon dioxide, stabilizer, amorphous solid dispersion, low water solubility

Keywords: colloidal silicon dioxide, stabilizer, amorphous solid dispersion, low water solubility

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Author Biographies

Smruti P. Chaudhari, Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, 11201, USA

Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, 11201, USA

Mittal Bhadiyadra, Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, 11201, USA

Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, 11201, USA

Rutesh H. Dave, Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, 11201, USA

Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York, 11201, USA

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Chaudhari SP, Bhadiyadra M, Dave RH. Evaluating the effect of the porous and non-porous colloidal silicon dioxide as a stabilizer on amorphous solid dispersion. JDDT [Internet]. 15Sep.2020 [cited 25Sep.2020];10(5):255-63. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/4323