Phenolics Contents, Xanthine Oxidoreductase Inhibitory Potential, Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activities of Cachrys libanotis L. Root Extracts

  • Sana AOUACHRIA Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria
  • Sabah Boumerfeg Department of Biology, Faculty of Nature and Life Sciences, University Bordj Bou-Arraridj 34000, Algeria
  • Abderrahim Benslama Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria
  • Naouel Boussoualim Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria
  • Hayat Trabsa Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria
  • Abderrahmane Baghiani Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria

Abstract

To date, no studies have investigated the phytochemical screening and biological activities of Cachrys libanotis L. traditionally used for the treatment of gout and rheumatism. Therefore, we aimed to investigate, for the first time, the phytochemical contents, the xanthine oxidoreductase inhibition, antibacterial, and antioxidant activities of extracts derived from the roots of C. libanotis L. Roots were submitted to extraction and fractionation using three different solvents sequentially, in the ascending order of polarity. Subsequently, XOR was purified from bovine milk and its inhibition was evaluated using xanthine/XOR system. The antioxidant activities were assessed employed superoxide scavenging, β- carotene bleaching, DPPH scavenging, ferrous iron chelation and FRAP assays). The antibacterial activity was tested by disc diffusion assay against 11 ATCC strains. Extraction and fractionation gave crude extract (CrE), hexane extract (HxE), chloroform extract (ChE), ethyle acetate extract (EAE) and aqueous extract (AqE).  EAE exhibited the highest XOR inhibitory effect. CrE exhibited the highest effect as DPPH scavenger. All fractions exhibited a good activity against linoleate oxidation. Both CrE and AqE had an excellent chelating activity. Extracts showed a medium reducing power with greatest value exhibited by EAE. The plant extracts exhibited moderate to good antibacterial activity where the HxE extract had the strongest antimicrobial activity. From the obtained results, C. libanotis roots might be helpful in preventing or slowing the progress of gout, and it could be used as an additive in the food industry providing good protection against oxidative damage.


Keywords: Cachrys libanotis, polyphenols, oxidative stress, xanthine-oxidoreductase (XOR), antimicrobial.

Keywords: Cachrys libanotis, polyphenols, oxidative stress, xanthine-oxidoreductase (XOR), antimicrobial

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Sana AOUACHRIA, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria

Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria

Sabah Boumerfeg, Department of Biology, Faculty of Nature and Life Sciences, University Bordj Bou-Arraridj 34000, Algeria

Department of Biology, Faculty of Nature and Life Sciences, University Bordj Bou-Arraridj 34000, Algeria

Abderrahim Benslama, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria

Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria

Naouel Boussoualim, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria

Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria

Hayat Trabsa, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria

Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria

Abderrahmane Baghiani, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria

Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, Faculty of Natural and Life sciences, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, Setif 19000, Algeria

References

1. Hussein RA, El-Anssary AA. Plants secondary metabolites: the key drivers of the pharmacological actions of medicinal plants. In : Builders P, editor. Herbal Medecine. IntechOpen; 2018. p 13–30.
2. Negrào R, Faria A. Natural polyphenols as anti-oxidant, anti-infammatory and anti-angiogenic agents in the metabolic syndrome. In: Soares R, Costa C, editors. Oxidative stress, inflammation and angiogenesis in the metabolic syndrome. Springer; 2009. p 147–180.
3. Ruiz‐Cruz S, Chaparro‐Hernández S, Hernández‐ Ruiz KL, Cira‐Chávez LA, Estrada‐Alvarado MI, Gassos Orteg LE, et al. Flavonoids: Important Biocompounds in Food. In Justino J, editor. Flavonoids - From Biosynthesis to Human Health. IntechOpen; 2017. p 353–369.
4. Di Meo S, Reed TT, Venditti P, Victor VM. Role of ROS and RNS sources in physiological and pathological conditions. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2016; 2016:1245049.
5. Kurutas EB. The importance of antioxidants which play the role in cellular response against oxidative/nitrosative stress: current state. Nutrition J. 2016; 15:17.
6. Libetta C, Sepe V, Esposito P, Galli F, Dal Canton A. Oxidative stress and infammation: implications in uremia and hemodialysis. Clin Biochem. 2011; 44:1189–1198.
7. Liguori I, Russo G, Curcio F, Bulli G, Aran L, Della-Morte D, et al. Oxidative stress, aging, and diseases. Clin Interv Aging. 2018;13:757–772.
8. Hille R, Nishino T. Xanthine oxidase and xanthine deshydrogenase. FASEB J. 1995; 9:995–1003.
9. Harrison R. Milk xanthine oxidase: properties and physiological roles. Intern Dairy J. 2006; 16:546–554.
10. Saches L, Batffra KL, Zimmermann B. Medical implications of hyperuricemia. Med Health. 2009; 92:353–355.
11. Pacher P, Nivorozhkin A, Szabo C. Therapeutic effects of xanthine oxidase inhibitors: renaissance half a century after the discovery of allopurinol. Pharmacol Rev. 2006; 58:87–114.
12. Demain AL, Sanchez S. Microbial drug discovery: 80 years of progress. J Antibiot. 2009; 62:5–16.
13. Aslam B, Wang W, Arshad MI, Khurshid M, Muzammil S, Rasool MH, et al. Antibiotic resistance: a rundown of a global crisis. Infect Drug Resist. 2018; 11:1645–1658.
14. Quezel P, Santa S. Nouvelle flore de l' Algerie et des régions desertiques méridionales. Paris : Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique;1963. p 658–659.
15. Baghiani A, Harrison R, Benboubetra M. Purification and partial characterisation of camel milk xanthine oxidoreductase. Arch Physiol Biochem. 2003; 111:407–414.
16. Venton AM, Deistung J, Bray RC. The isolation of demolybdo xanthine oxidase from bovine milk. Biochem J. 1988; 255:949–956.
17. Bray RC. Molybdenum iron–sulfur flavin hydroxylases and related enzymes. In : Boyer PD, editor. The enzyme. New York : Academic Press; 1975. p 299–419.
18. Laemmli UK. Cleavage of structural proteins during the assembly of the head of bacteriophage T4. Nature.1970; 227:680–685.
19. Avis P, Bergel F, Bray RC, James DWF, Shooter K. Cellular constituent, the chemistry of xanthine oxidase, Part II, The homogeneity of crystalline metalloflavoprotein. J chem Soci. 1959; Resumed: 1212–1219.
20. Markham KR. Techniques of flavonoid identification (Chapter 1 and 2). London : Academic Press; 1982. p 1–113.
21. Li HB, Cheng KW, Wong CC, Fan KW, Chen F, Jiang Y. Evaluation of antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content of different fractions of selected microalgae. Food Chem. 2007; 102:771–776.
22. Bahorun T, Gressier B, Trotin F, Brunete C, Dine T. Oxigen species scavenging activity of phenolic extract from howthorn fresh plant organs and pharmaceutical preparation. Arzneimittel-forschung. 1996; 46:1086–1094.
23. Boumerfeg S, Baghiani A, Messaoudi D, Khennouf S, Arrar L. Antioxidant Properties and Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Effects of Tamus communis L. Root Extracts. Phytother Res. 2009; 23:283–288.
24. Robak J, Gryglewski RJ. Flavonoids are scavengers of superoxide anions. Biochem Pharmacol. 1988; 37:837–841.
25. Ani V, Varadaraj MC, Akhilender Naidu K. Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of polyphenolic compounds from bitter cumin (Cuminum nigrum L.). Europ food Res technol. 2006; 224:109–115.
26. Aslan A, Güllüce M, Sôkmen M, Adigüzel A, Sahin F, Özkan H. Antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of the lichens Cladonia foliacea, Dermatocarpon miniatum, Everinia divaricata, Evernia prunastri, and Neofuscella pulla. Pharm Biol. 2006; 44:247–252.
27. Cuendet M, Hostettmann K, Dyatmiko W, Potterat O. Iridoid glucosides with free radical scavenging propreties from Fagraea blumei. Helvitica Chimica Acta. 1997; 80:1144–1152.
28. Decker EA,Welch . Role of ferritin as a lipid oxidation catalyst in muscle food. J Agric Food Chem. 1990; 38:674–677.
29. Le K, Chiu F, Ng K. Identification and quantification of antioxidants in Fructus lycii. Food Chem. 2007; 105:353–363.
30. Benzie IF, Strain JJ. The ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) as a measure of ''antioxidant power'': the FRAP Assay. Anal Biochem. 1996; 239:70–76.
31. Pulido R, Bravo L, Saura-Calixto F. Antioxidant activity of dietary polyphenols as determined by a modified ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay. J Agric Food Chem. 2000; 40:3396–3402.
32. Baghiani A, Boussoualim N, Trabsa H, Aouachria S, Arrar L. In Vivo free radical scavenging, antihemolytic activity and antibacterial effects of Anchusa Azurea extracts. Int J Med Med Sci. 2016; 46:1114–1118.
33. Fitriansyah SN, Fidrianny I, Ruslan K. Correlation of total phenolic, flavonoid and carotenoid content of sesbania sesban (l merr) leaves extract with DPPH scavenging activties. Int J Pharmacogn Phytochem Res.2017; 9:89–94.
34. Boussoualim N, Krache I, Baghiani A, Trabsa H, Aouachria S, Arrar L. Human xanthine oxidase inhibitory effect, antioxidant in vivo of algerian extracts (Globularia alypum L.). Int J Pharmacogn Phytochem Res. 2016; 8:645–650.
35. Wu N, Zu Y, Fu Y, Kong Y, Zhao J, Li X, et al. Antioxidant activities and xanthine oxidase inhibitory effects of extracts and main polyphenolic compounds obtained from Geranium sibiricum L. J Agric Food Chem. 2010; 58:4737–4743.
36. Cos P, Ying L, Calomme M, Hu JP, Cimanga K, Van Poel B, et al. Structure activity relationship and classification of flavonoids as inhibitors of xanthine oxidase and superoxide scavengers. J Natur Prod. 1998; 61:71–76.
37. Mandade R, Sreenivas SA, Choudhury A. Radical scavenging and antioxidant activity of Carthamus tinctorius extracts. Free Radic Antiox. 2011; 1:87–93.
38. Naidu MM, Shyamala BN, Naik JP, Sulochanamma G, Srinivas P. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of the husk and endosperm of fenugreek seeds. Lebenson Wiss Technol. 2011; 44:451–456.
39. Pandey G, Khatoon S, Pandey, Rawat AKS. Altitudinal variation of berberine, total phenolics and flavonoid content in Thalictrum foliolosum and their correlation with antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. J Ayurveda Integr Med. 2018; 9:169–176.
40. Nur Arina AJ, Azrina A. Comparison of phenolic content and antioxidant activity of fresh and fried local fruits. Inter Food Res J. 2016; 23:1717–1724.
41. Othman A, Mukhtar NJ, Ismail NI, Chang SK. Phenolics, flavonoids content and antioxidant activities of 4 Malaysian herbal plants. Inter Food Res J. 2014; 21:759–766.
42. Sahreen S, Khan, Khan RA. Evaluation of antioxidant profile of various solvent extracts of Carissa opaca leaves: an edible plant. Chem Centrl J. 2017; 11:83.
43. Saha S, Verma RJ. Antioxidant activity of polyphenolic extract of Terminalia chebula Retzius fruits. J Taibah Univ Sci. 2016; 10:805–812.
44. Anwar F, Shaheen N, Shabir G, Ashraf M, Alkharfy KM, Gilani AH. Variation in antioxidant activity and phenolic and flavonoid contents in the flowers and leaves of Ghaneri (Lantana camara L) as affected by different extraction solvents. Inter J Pharmacol. 2013; 9:442–453.
45. Sahreen S, Khan MR, Khan RA. Evaluation of antioxidant activities of various solvent extracts of Carissa opaca fruits. Food Chem. 2010; 122:1205–1211.
46. Fernandez MT, Mira ML, Florêncio MH, Jennings KR. Iron and copper chelation by flavonoids: an electrospray mass spectrometry study. J Inor Biochem. 2002; 92:105–111.
47. Papuc G, Goran GV, Predescu CN, Nicorescu V, Stefan G. Plant polyphenols as antioxidant and antibacterial agents for shelf-life extension of meat and meat products: classification, structures, sources, and action mechanisms. Compr Rev Food Sci Food Saf. 2017; 16:1243–1268.
48. Esmaeili AK, Taha RM, Mohajer S, Banisalam B. Antioxidant activity and total phenolic and flavonoid content of various solvent extracts from in vivo and in vitro grown Trifolium pratense L. (red clover). BioMed Res Inter. 2015; 2015:643285.
49. Borneo R, León AE, Aguirre A, Ribotta A, Cantero JJ. Antioxidant capacity of medicinal plants from the Province of Córdoba (Argentina) and their in vitro testing in a model food system. Food Chem1. 2009; 12:664–670.
50. Loganayaki N, Siddhuraju P, Manian S. Antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging capacity of phenolic extracts from Helicteres isora L. and Ceiba pentandra L. J Food Sci Technol. 2013; 50:687–695.
51. Harries AD, Kumar AMV, Satyanarayana S, Lin Y, Takarinda K C, Tweya H, et al. Communicable and non-communicable diseases: connections, synergies and benefits of integrating care. Public Health Action. 2015; 5:156-157.
Statistics
130 Views | 132 Downloads
How to Cite
1.
AOUACHRIA S, Boumerfeg S, Benslama A, Boussoualim N, Trabsa H, Baghiani A. Phenolics Contents, Xanthine Oxidoreductase Inhibitory Potential, Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activities of Cachrys libanotis L. Root Extracts. JDDT [Internet]. 15Aug.2020 [cited 23Apr.2021];10(4-s):71-9. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/4278