Phytochemical Analysis, Antioxidant Activities and GC-MS Profiling of Ethanol Bract Extract of Musa paradisiaca L.

  • Perumal Arumugam Department of Biotechnology, Karpaga Vinayaga College of Engineering and Technology, Madhuranthagam, Kancheepuram – 603 308
  • Krishna Saraswathi Department of Biotechnology, Karpaga Vinayaga College of Engineering and Technology, Madhuranthagam, Kancheepuram – 603 308
  • Dhanasekar Dhivya ARMATS Biotek Training and Research Institute, Guindy, Chennai – 600 032
  • Chandrasekaran Sivaraj ARMATS Biotek Training and Research Institute, Guindy, Chennai – 600 032

Abstract

In recent year’s trend towards authentication, standardization and quality assurance of selected medicinal plants has been rapid increase for potential therapeutic significance. Despite the modern techniques, identification of plant drug by pharmacognostic study is more reliable. In Ayurveda, a traditional system of medicine Musa Paradisiaca is commonly used in Asthma, Diabetes, Anthelmintic, Hypertension, Insomnia, Snake bite. The whole plant as well as specific parts (leaves, ripe and unripe fruits, stems) of plant extract and its active constituents have been used for the treatment of large number of human ailments. Phytochemicals are virtually present in all the fruits, vegetables, pulses/legumes and grains which are commonly consumed, so it is quite easy to incorporate them in our daily diet. Current research studies were carried out for evaluating the antioxidant activities of ethanol bract extract of Musa paradisiaca. Antioxidant activities such as DPPH˙ radical, Superoxide (O2.-) radical, Nitric Oxide (NO) radical, ABTS+ radical cation, phosphomolybdenum reduction and Fe3+ reduction were carried out for ethanol bract extract of Musa paradisiaca. The maximum DPPH˙ radical, Superoxide (O2.-) radical and Nitric Oxide (NO) radical scavenging activities were 52.05±0.38%, 57.71±0.45% and 49.63±0.32% at 120 µg/mL concentration and the IC50 values were 68.47 µg/mL, 71.37 µg/mL and 93.94 µg/mL concentrations respectively. The maximum ABTS+ radical cation scavenging activity was 84.28±0.13% at 30 µg/mL concentration and the IC50 value was 10.04 µg/mL concentration respectively. The maximum Mo6+ reduction and Fe3+ reduction were 45.38±0.40% and 57.06±0.32% at 120 µg/mL concentration and the RC50 values were 121.44 µg/mL and 85.43 µg/mL concentrations respectively. Z-2-Tridecen-1-ol, Nonadecane-2,4-dione, a-Ketostearic acid, 2,5-Furandione, dihydro-3-(2-tetradecenyl)- were found to be the potent antioxidant compounds detected from GC-MS analysis.


Keywords: Antioxidant, phenolic compounds, Nitric Oxide (NO) radical, ABTS+ radical cation, Fe3+ reduction and a-Ketostearic acid.

Keywords: Antioxidant, phenolic compounds, Nitric Oxide (NO) radical, ABTS● radical cation, Fe3 reduction and a-Ketostearic acid

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Author Biographies

Perumal Arumugam, Department of Biotechnology, Karpaga Vinayaga College of Engineering and Technology, Madhuranthagam, Kancheepuram – 603 308

Department of Biotechnology, Karpaga Vinayaga College of Engineering and Technology, Madhuranthagam, Kancheepuram – 603 308

Krishna Saraswathi, Department of Biotechnology, Karpaga Vinayaga College of Engineering and Technology, Madhuranthagam, Kancheepuram – 603 308

Department of Biotechnology, Karpaga Vinayaga College of Engineering and Technology, Madhuranthagam, Kancheepuram – 603 308

Dhanasekar Dhivya, ARMATS Biotek Training and Research Institute, Guindy, Chennai – 600 032

ARMATS Biotek Training and Research Institute, Guindy, Chennai – 600 032

Chandrasekaran Sivaraj, ARMATS Biotek Training and Research Institute, Guindy, Chennai – 600 032

ARMATS Biotek Training and Research Institute, Guindy, Chennai – 600 032

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Arumugam P, Saraswathi K, Dhivya D, Sivaraj C. Phytochemical Analysis, Antioxidant Activities and GC-MS Profiling of Ethanol Bract Extract of Musa paradisiaca L. JDDT [Internet]. 15Aug.2020 [cited 22Apr.2021];10(4-s):167-75. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/4273