In Vitro Antimicrobial, Antiviral and Cytotoxicity Activities of Aspergillus oryzae Isolated From El-Baida Marsh in Algeria

  • Nacef Houda Sara Department of Microbiology and Laboratory of Applied Microbiology, Faculty of Nature and Life Sciences, Ferhat Abbas Setif 1 University, Algeria
  • Belhattab Rachid Department of Biochemistry and Laboratory of Applied Microbiology, Faculty of Nature and Life Sciences, Ferhat Abbas Setif1 University, Algeria
  • Galvez Julio Department of Pharmacology, Biomedical Research Center (CIBM), 18071-Granada University, Spain
  • Rodriguez-Sojo María Jesus Department of Pharmacology, Biomedical Research Center (CIBM), 18071-Granada University, Spain
  • Vezza Teresa Department of Pharmacology, Biomedical Research Center (CIBM), 18071-Granada University, Spain

Abstract

This work covers the study of antimicrobial and antiviral activities of the Aspergillus oryzae strain isolated from saline soil (El-Baida marsh in Algeria). The crude extract obtained with ethyl acetate displayed antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and the yeast Candida albicans with a mean of 16.69 mm of inhibition zone and a minimal inhibitory concentrations MICs between 7.28 and 21.85 μgmL-1. We also assessed the antiviral activity against Herpes simplex-2 Virus (HSV-2), in which no inhibitory effect was exhibited. In addition, cytotoxicity activity was tested in Caco-2 and RAW 264, a human epithelial and a murine macrophage cell line, respectively, revealing a no-toxic effect of the extract. The studied isolate extract possesses an antimicrobial property and its non-toxicity to the host cells becomes very important, and can be exploited for the production of new pharmacological and biotechnological agents.       


Keywords: Aspergillus oryzae, antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, cytotoxicity, fungal extraction.

Keywords: Aspergillus oryzae, antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, cytotoxicity, fungal extraction.

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Author Biographies

Nacef Houda Sara, Department of Microbiology and Laboratory of Applied Microbiology, Faculty of Nature and Life Sciences, Ferhat Abbas Setif 1 University, Algeria

Department of Microbiology and Laboratory of Applied Microbiology, Faculty of Nature and Life Sciences, Ferhat Abbas Setif 1 University, Algeria

Belhattab Rachid, Department of Biochemistry and Laboratory of Applied Microbiology, Faculty of Nature and Life Sciences, Ferhat Abbas Setif1 University, Algeria

Department of Biochemistry and Laboratory of Applied Microbiology, Faculty of Nature and Life Sciences, Ferhat Abbas Setif1 University, Algeria

Galvez Julio, Department of Pharmacology, Biomedical Research Center (CIBM), 18071-Granada University, Spain

Department of Pharmacology, Biomedical Research Center (CIBM), 18071-Granada University, Spain

Rodriguez-Sojo María Jesus, Department of Pharmacology, Biomedical Research Center (CIBM), 18071-Granada University, Spain

Department of Pharmacology, Biomedical Research Center (CIBM), 18071-Granada University, Spain

Vezza Teresa, Department of Pharmacology, Biomedical Research Center (CIBM), 18071-Granada University, Spain

Department of Pharmacology, Biomedical Research Center (CIBM), 18071-Granada University, Spain

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1.
Houda Sara N, Rachid B, Julio G, Jesus R-SM, Teresa V. In Vitro Antimicrobial, Antiviral and Cytotoxicity Activities of Aspergillus oryzae Isolated From El-Baida Marsh in Algeria. JDDT [Internet]. 15Jul.2020 [cited 4Aug.2020];10(4):191-5. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/4261