Psychological and Anxiety/Depression Level Assessment among Quarantine People during Covid19 Outbreak

  • Kushagra Sharma Department of Pharmacy Practice, NIMS University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India
  • Joseph Saji Department of Pharmacy Practice, NIMS University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India
  • Ranjeet Kumar Department of Pharmacy Practice, NIMS University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India
  • Abins Raju Department of Pharmacy Practice, NIMS University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India

Abstract

Background- Covid-19 outbreak results in lockdown of provinces by isolating the infected ones and quarantine the population to prevent community spread of corona virus. During quarantine people has to restrict their movement and keep themselves under self-isolation at their home to prevent infections. In long quarantine period it may create psychological or anxiety/depression problem for some people. The objective of our study is to assess and understand the level of psychological, anxiety/depression in quarantine people during covid19 outbreak.


Methods- Self-designed digital questionnaire has been used to assess the psychological and anxiety/depression level. The questionnaire contains questions about demographic, socio-assessment, anxiety/depression and psychological assessment. The questionnaire was circulated via digital medium.


Result- Total 181 quarantined people were participated in our study, most of our population ages between of 21-30. General health of our participants is moderately good, Socio-status of our participants is fairly effected may be due to restrict movement and conservative way of living during quarantine period. 60.8% of participants become nervous some of the time, about 50% of participants shows the anxiety/depression symptoms, about 30% of our participants are somewhat affected by their sleeping patterns and about 35% participants are sometimes unsatisfied or slightly satisfied during quarantine period. Apart from this out of 181 participants 15 people are having travel history of International or national destinations. The overall mean is 2.2 and SD is 0.6.


Conclusion-We found somewhat negative emotions (anxiety/depression, Socio status) in people during quarantine. Which may show low quality of life or low satisfactory life.


Keywords: Covid-19, lockdown, quarantine, anxiety, depression

Keywords: Covid-19, lockdown, quarantine, anxiety

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Author Biographies

Kushagra Sharma, Department of Pharmacy Practice, NIMS University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India

Department of Pharmacy Practice, NIMS University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India

Joseph Saji, Department of Pharmacy Practice, NIMS University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India

Department of Pharmacy Practice, NIMS University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India

Ranjeet Kumar, Department of Pharmacy Practice, NIMS University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India

Department of Pharmacy Practice, NIMS University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India

Abins Raju, Department of Pharmacy Practice, NIMS University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India

Department of Pharmacy Practice, NIMS University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India

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Sharma K, Saji J, Kumar R, Raju A. Psychological and Anxiety/Depression Level Assessment among Quarantine People during Covid19 Outbreak. JDDT [Internet]. 15May2020 [cited 1Jun.2020];10(3):198-01. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/4103