Humoral response of broilers to live Newcastle Disease virus vaccines manufactured by different companies

  • Muhammad Danish Mehmood Ottoman Pharma (Immuno Division), Raiwind Road Lahore-Pakistan
  • Huma Anwar Ottoman Pharma (Immuno Division), Raiwind Road Lahore-Pakistan
  • Aamra Hashim Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Lahore-Pakistan
  • Muhammad Ismail Grandparent Diagnostic Laboratory, Lahore, Pakistan
  • Sajjad Hussain Veterinary Research Institute, Lahore, Pakistan

Abstract

Increased incidence and severity of fatal Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in commercial and domestic poultry has been reported from across Pakistan. The present study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of various live NDV vaccines (Gallivac, Intervet and Ceva) by adapting different vaccination schemes in broilers. Antigenic count of each vaccine and its generated antibody were determined by Haeamagglutination and Haemagglutination inhibition tests respectively. Two different NDV vaccination schemes were tested in such a way that one group had received three vaccines in different time periods whereas, the other after priming at 0 day, was followed by a single booster dose. For this purpose, healthy broilers were divided into four groups A, B, C, and D. On zero day of vaccination, there was no detectable anti NDV-HI titer for all vaccines (Gallivac=2, Intervet=2 & Ceva=2). In first vaccination scheme, detectable anti NDV-HI titer was observed on 16th day of vaccination (Gallivac=3.8, Intervet=4.2 & Ceva=3.6). All vaccines showed protective anti NDV-HI titer on 32nd day, post vaccination (Gallivac=5.8, Intervet=6.2, Ceva=5.8). In second vaccination scheme, detectable anti NDV-HI titer was achieved on 16th day of post vaccination (Gallivac=3.8, Intervet=4.2 & Ceva=3.6). While on 32nd day vaccination, all vaccines showed protective anti NDV-HI titer (Gallivac=5.4, Intervet=5.6 & Ceva=5.2). It is concluded that the two-dose vaccination program, with interval of 12 days, is much effective than the 3-dose vaccination scheme. However, in broilers, anti-NDV antibody titer was induced by all three types of vaccines manufactured by various companies.


Keywords: Newcastle disease virus, Humoral Response, Haemagglutination inhibition test, Vaccine schedule

Keywords: Newcastle disease virus, Humoral Response, Haemagglutination inhibition test, Vaccine schedule

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Author Biographies

Muhammad Danish Mehmood, Ottoman Pharma (Immuno Division), Raiwind Road Lahore-Pakistan

Ottoman Pharma (Immuno Division), Raiwind Road Lahore-Pakistan

Huma Anwar, Ottoman Pharma (Immuno Division), Raiwind Road Lahore-Pakistan

Ottoman Pharma (Immuno Division), Raiwind Road Lahore-Pakistan

Aamra Hashim, Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Lahore-Pakistan

Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Lahore-Pakistan

Muhammad Ismail, Grandparent Diagnostic Laboratory, Lahore, Pakistan

Grandparent Diagnostic Laboratory, Lahore, Pakistan

Sajjad Hussain, Veterinary Research Institute, Lahore, Pakistan

Veterinary Research Institute, Lahore, Pakistan

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1.
Mehmood MD, Anwar H, Hashim A, Ismail M, Hussain S. Humoral response of broilers to live Newcastle Disease virus vaccines manufactured by different companies. JDDT [Internet]. 15May2020 [cited 1Jun.2020];10(3):179-84. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/4035