Total phenolic and flavonoids contents in the standardized polyherbal formulation “vayusadi guggulu”

Total phenolic and flavonoids contents in the standardized vayusadi guggulu

  • Vaishali Sharma Department of Pharmacognosy, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India
  • Monika Dhaka Department of Pharmaceutics, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India
  • Jyoti Dhama Department of Pharmaceutics, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India
  • Monika Sharma Department of pharmacology, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India
  • Md Rafiul Haque Department of Pharmacognosy, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India

Abstract

Vayusadi guggulu vati (VGV), a polyherbal formulation is recommended for the management of diseases like obesity, arthritis, hyperlipidaemia and hyper cholesterol. Though Vayusadi guggulu vati is widely used for the treatment of obesity in Ayurvedic System of Indian Medicine, but till date, its quality standard study has not been carried outIn the present article, we evaluated the total phenolic and flavonoid contents in the standarised polyherbal VGV. The total phenolic content was determined by Folin Ciocalteu reagent (FC reagent) method. Aluminum chloride colorimetric method was used for total flavonoids contents determination. The VGV was standardized by physic-chemical parameters like total ash value, acid insoluble ash, loss on drying (LOD), PH, extractive value, phytochemical tests and thin layer chromatography (TLC). Determination of microbial load in different dilutions was also performed. Quality determination of vati (tablet) was also evaluated with help of various tablet parameters. Microbial load study revealed the growth of microbes increases with increases the dilutions. The phenolic and flavonoid contents in VGV were 190.16 ± 5.07 mg/g and 80.216 ± 2.07 mg/ g respectively. Physicochemical parameters such as total ash value (9.73 ± 1.45% W/W), acid insoluble ash (1.85± 0.40 % W/W), LOD (4.77 ± 0.45%W/W), PH 1% (4.6) water soluble extract (64.69 ± 3.42% W/W), alcohal soluble extract (50.56 ± 2.48% W/W) were assessed in preliminary physicochemical scanning. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) fingerprints study revealed that alcoholic and hexane extract of formulation showed 3 spots with different resolution in long wave UV 366 nm. TLC study revealed genuinely, quality and purity of formulation. Physico-chemical and microbial load result revealed that the formulation has a good quality. The inference from the present study may be used as reference standard in the further quality control researches.


Key words:  Phenolic contents, flavonoid contents, microbial load, vayusadi guggulu vati

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Author Biographies

Vaishali Sharma, Department of Pharmacognosy, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India

Department of Pharmacognosy, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India

Monika Dhaka, Department of Pharmaceutics, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India

Department of Pharmaceutics, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India

Jyoti Dhama, Department of Pharmaceutics, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India

Department of Pharmaceutics, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India

Monika Sharma, Department of pharmacology, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India

Department of pharmacology, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India

Md Rafiul Haque, Department of Pharmacognosy, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India

Department of Pharmacognosy, HIMT College of Pharmacy, Knowledge park1, Gr. Noida (U.P), India

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Sharma V, Dhaka M, Dhama J, Sharma M, Haque MR. Total phenolic and flavonoids contents in the standardized polyherbal formulation “vayusadi guggulu”. JDDT [Internet]. 15Mar.2020 [cited 3Jul.2020];10(2):97-01. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/3974