Preparation and Evaluation of Sodium Alginate Microparticles using Pepsin

  • Sankha Bhattacharya Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA
  • Vishal Puri Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA
  • Shubham Sharma Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA
  • Debasish Sahoo Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA
  • Pradeep Kumar Pal Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA
  • Sima Kujur Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA
  • Gaurav Goyal Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA
  • Amandeep Singh Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Abstract

Aim: The main aim of this article is to prepare and evaluate sodium alginate microparticles and evaluate on the basis of their characterization. The drug is dissolved, encapsulated or attached to a microparticles matrix. Depending upon method of preparation microparticles were obtained. Microparticles were developed as a carrier for vaccines and other disease like rheumatoid arthritis, cancer etc. Microparticles were developed to increase the efficacy of active pharmaceutical ingredient to a specific targeted site.


Material and Method: Microparticles of Sodium Alginate, Pepsin and Calcium Chloride were prepared in six batches (A-F) with different ratio of sodium alginate and calcium chloride respectively i.e. (0.25:2.5), (0.25:5), (0.25:7.5), (0.5:2.5), (0.5:5), (0.5:7.5) by using a homogenizing method. Microparticles were evaluated for particle size distribution, zeta potential and morphology.


Result and Discussion:  The normal particle size of each of the six batches were analyzed by Zeta Sizer (Delsa C Particle Analyzer) and it was found that the Batch B (0.25:5) delivered the best microparticles with size distribution of 1.2731 (µm). All batches were seen under Motic magnifying microscope by using the Sulforhodamine B (M.W. 479.02) color as staining dye. Microparticles was found to be semi spherical in shape.


Conclusion: Results of all the six batches was contrasted based on particle size investigation, zeta potential and morphology. Batch B (0.25:5) was considered as the best formulation.


Key words:  Micro Particle, Pepsin, Sodium Alginate and Calcium Chloride, Sulforhodamine B, Zeta Sizer.

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Author Biographies

Sankha Bhattacharya, Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Vishal Puri, Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Shubham Sharma, Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Debasish Sahoo, Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Pradeep Kumar Pal, Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Sima Kujur, Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Gaurav Goyal, Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Amandeep Singh, Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, GT Road (NH-95), Ghal Kalan, Moga, Punjab 142001, INDIA

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1.
Bhattacharya S, Puri V, Sharma S, Sahoo D, Pal PK, Kujur S, Goyal G, Singh A. Preparation and Evaluation of Sodium Alginate Microparticles using Pepsin. JDDT [Internet]. 15Mar.2020 [cited 8Jul.2020];10(2):5-1. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/3901