In Silico Toxicological, Anti-Tubercular Effect Evaluation And In Vitro Marine Pathogenic Bacteria Inhibition of N-[(3-Chloro-4-Nitro-Phenyl)Methyleneamino]Pyridine-4-Carboxamidine

Toxicological, Anti-Tubercular Effect Evaluation

  • Kamel Mokhnache Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria
  • EL-Khamsa Soltani Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria
  • Soraya Madoui Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria
  • Hanane Khither Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria
  • Ahlem Karbab Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria
  • Noureddine Charef Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria
  • Lekhmici Arrar Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

Abstract

The hydrazone; N-[(3-chloro-4-nitro-phenyl) methyleneamino] pyridine-4-carboxamidine (H) was selected for in silico toxicological and in vitro bactericidal studies. Toxicological investigation was carried out using software program, such as eMolTox and Gusar, for the toxic substructure determination, and acute rat toxicity prediction respectively. In vitro bactericidal effect evaluation was investigated using tow marine pathogenic bacteria; Vibrio anguillarum and Photobacterium damselae. Computational results determinate toxicophores of (H), which are nitro-aromatic part, hydrazine group, and quaternary carbon, were predicted as responsible for Idiosyncratic toxicity metabolic activation, covalent bond with DNA, and hepatotoxicity respectively. In addition, the predicted LD50 of (H) are 1086, 244, 1816, and 823.40 mg/kg in intraperitenial, intravenous, oral and subcutaneous administration respectively. For bactericidal results, H exhibited an excellent effect with inhibition percentages of 98.65 and 98.83% at the concentrations of 1000 and 500 µg/mL against Vibrio anguillarum respectively, the same effect was demonstrated against Photobacterium damselae with inhibition percentages of 97.74 and 97.98 % at the same concentrations. For anti-tubercular effect prediction, results revealed that H has an excellent effect with probability percentage of 84.6%.  


Keyword: Hydrazone, toxicophore, LD50, Anti-tubercular, Vibrio anguillarum, Photobacterium damselae.     

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Author Biographies

Kamel Mokhnache, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

EL-Khamsa Soltani, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

Soraya Madoui, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

Hanane Khither, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

Ahlem Karbab, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

Noureddine Charef, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

Lekhmici Arrar, Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

Laboratory of Applied Biochemistry, University Ferhat Abbas Setif 1, 19000, Algeria

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How to Cite
Mokhnache, K., Soltani, E.-K., Madoui, S., Khither, H., Karbab, A., Charef, N., & Arrar, L. (2019). In Silico Toxicological, Anti-Tubercular Effect Evaluation And In Vitro Marine Pathogenic Bacteria Inhibition of N-[(3-Chloro-4-Nitro-Phenyl)Methyleneamino]Pyridine-4-Carboxamidine. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 9(6), 23-27. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v9i6.3653

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