Antioxidant Potential of Psoralea corylifolia and Psoralea esculenta seeds: Comparative Study

  • Neeraj Singh Bhagwant University, Ajmer, Rajasthan, India
  • Prashant Kumar GSRM Memorial College of Pharmacy, Lucknow, U.P., India
  • Girendra Kumar Gautam GSRM Memorial College of Pharmacy, Lucknow, U.P., India
  • Bipin Bihari GSRM Memorial College of Pharmacy, Lucknow, U.P., India

Abstract

The Psoralea corylifolia L. & Psoralea esculenta seeds are traditionally used herbal medicine, but its comparative antioxidant activity has not been studied. The methanolic crude extracts of Psoralea corylifolia & Psoralea esculenta seeds were screened for their free radical scavenging properties using ascorbic acid as standard antioxidant. Free radical scavenging activity was evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical. The overall antioxidant activity of Psoralea corylifolia was found to be the strongest. The IC50 values of the extracts found 0.14 ± 0 & 0.05 ± 0 mg/l respectively. The ascorbic acid levels found19.3 ± 0.10 &11.7 ± 0.49 mg/100g andthe carotenoids content were observed 28.65 ± 0.24 &16.82 ± 1.16 mg/100g in plant extracts. The highest total phenols content were found to be in Psoralea corylifolia with the value 31.2 ± 0.24 mg/g.The present study reveals that the selected plants would exert several beneficial effects by virtue of their antioxidant activity and may be taken for drug formulation.


Keywords: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl, antioxidant, phenol, radical scavenger.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Neeraj Singh, Bhagwant University, Ajmer, Rajasthan, India

Bhagwant University, Ajmer, Rajasthan, India

Prashant Kumar, GSRM Memorial College of Pharmacy, Lucknow, U.P., India

GSRM Memorial College of Pharmacy, Lucknow, U.P., India

Girendra Kumar Gautam, GSRM Memorial College of Pharmacy, Lucknow, U.P., India

GSRM Memorial College of Pharmacy, Lucknow, U.P., India

Bipin Bihari, GSRM Memorial College of Pharmacy, Lucknow, U.P., India

GSRM Memorial College of Pharmacy, Lucknow, U.P., India

References

1. Young IS, Woodside JV (2001). Antioxidants in health and disease. J. Clin. Pathol. 54: 176-186.
2. Halliwell B (1994). Free radicals, antioxidants, and human disease: curiosity, cause, or consequence? Lancet. 344: 721-724.
3. Pourmorad F, Hosseinimehr SJ, Shahabimajd N (2006). Antioxidant activity, phenols, flavanoid contents of selected Iranian medicinal plants. S. Afr. J. Biotechnol. 5: 1142-1145.
4. Duh PD, Tu YY, Yen GC (1999). Antioxidants activity of aqueous extract of Harnjyur (Chrysanthemum morifoliumRamat).Lebensmwiss Technol. 32: 269-277.
5. Raja Sudarajan N, Ahamad H, Kumar V (2006). CytisusscopariusLink-A natural antioxidant. 6: 1-7
6. Cao G, Sofic ER, Prior RL (1996). Antioxidant capacity of tea and common vegetables. J. Agric. Food Chem. 44: 3426-3431.
7. Braca A, Sortino C, Politi M (2002). Antioxidant activity of flavonoids from Licanialicaniaeflora. J. Ethnopharmacol. 79: 379-381.
8. Yen GC, Duh PD (1994). Scavenging effect of methanolic extracts of peanut hulls on free-radical and active oxygen species. J. Agric. Food Chem. 42: 629-632.
9. Cakmak I, Marschner H (1992). Magnesium deficiency and high light intensity enhance activities of superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase in bean leaves. Plant Physiol. 98:1222-1227.
10. Jensen A (1978).Chlorophyll and carotenoids. In: Hallebust JA, Craigie JS. (eds). Handbook of Physiochemical and Biochemical Methods. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, pp. 5-70.
11. McDonald S, Prenzler PD, Autolovich M, Robards K (2001). Phenolic content and antioxidant activity of olive extracts. Food Chem. 73: 73- 84.
12. Koleva II, Van Beek TA, Linseen JPH, de Groot A, Evstatieva LN (2002). Screening of plant extracts for antioxidant activity: a comparative study on three testing methods. Phytochem.Anal.13:8- 17.
13. Suresh PK, Sucheta S, Sudarshana VD, Selvamani P, Latha S (2008).Antioxidant activity in some selected Indian medicinal plants. Afr. J. Biotechnol. 7: 1826-1828.
14. Kanatt SR, Chander R, Sharma A (2007). Antioxidant potential of mint (MenthaspicataL.) in radiation- processed lamb meat. Food Chem. 100: 451-458.
15. Beyer RE (1994). The role of ascorbate in antioxidant protection of biomembranes: interaction with vit-E and coenzyme. Q. J. Bioen. Biomemb. 24: 349-358.
16. Aqil F, Ahmed I, Mehmood Z (2006). Antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties of twelve traditionally used Indian medicinal plants. Turk. J. Biol. 30:177-183.
17. Malencic D, Gasic O, Popovic M, Boza P (2000).Screening for antioxidant properties of Salvia reflexahornem.Phytother. Res. 14: 546-548.
18. Stivala LA, Savio M, Cazzalini O, Pizzala R, Rehak L, Bianchi L, Vannini V, Prosperi E (1996). Effect of _-carotene on cell cycle progression of human fibroblasts.Carcinogen. 17: 2395-2401.
19. Lee J, Jiang S, Levine N, Watson R (2000). Carotenoid supplementation reduces erythema in human skin after simulated solar radiation exposure. PSEMB. 2231:170-174.
20. Cook NC, Samman S (1996). Flavonoids-chemistry, metabolism, cardioprotective effects and dietary sources.Nutr.Biochem.7:66- 76.
21. Rice-Evans CA, Miller NJ, Paganga G (1997). Antioxidant properties of phenolic compounds.Trend. Plant Sci. 4:152-159.
Statistics
7 Views | 35 Downloads
How to Cite
Singh, N., Kumar, P., Gautam, G. K., & Bihari, B. (2019). Antioxidant Potential of Psoralea corylifolia and Psoralea esculenta seeds: Comparative Study. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 9(3-s), 740-743. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v9i3-s.2985