Protective Effect of Vitamin E on Haematological Parameters in Chronic Toxicity of Hexavalent Chromium in Laboratory Chicks

  • Vandita Kandpal Department of Zoology, S. V. Govt. P.G. College, Lohaghat, Champawat, Uttarakhand.
  • Dharmendra Kumar Department of Zoology, S. V. Govt. P.G. College, Lohaghat, Champawat, Uttarakhand, India
  • Rekha Bisht Department of Zoology, S. V. Govt. P.G. College, Lohaghat, Champawat, Uttarakhand, India

Abstract

Analysis of blood parameters is relevant to risk evaluation of alternations of the haematological system in humans and animals. Haematological parameters have been associated with health indices and are of diagnostic significance in routine clinical evaluation of the state of health of any individual. Present study was carried out to ascertain the antioxidant properties of vitamin E on haematological parameters caused by hexavalent chromium - Cr(VI) in laboratory chicks. Developing chicks (Croiler, body weight 100±20 gm) were used as experimental animals. Blood samples were collected from wing veins of chicks and analyzed after experiment. The haematological profile revealed a significant (p<0.05) reduction of Total Red Blood Cell count (RBC), total White Blood Cell count (WBC), Haemoglobin concentration (Hb), Packed cell volume (PCV) and Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) in toxin group compared to control group. However, the group of chicks treated with chromium and vitamin E alternatively, recorded significant increase in all these blood parameters indicating the protection offered by vitamin E as an ameliorating antioxidant against chromium toxicity.


Keywords: Haematological parameters, hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], vitamin E, antioxidant.

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Author Biographies

Vandita Kandpal, Department of Zoology, S. V. Govt. P.G. College, Lohaghat, Champawat, Uttarakhand.

Department of Zoology, S. V. Govt. P.G. College, Lohaghat, Champawat, Uttarakhand, India

Dharmendra Kumar, Department of Zoology, S. V. Govt. P.G. College, Lohaghat, Champawat, Uttarakhand, India

Department of Zoology, S. V. Govt. P.G. College, Lohaghat, Champawat, Uttarakhand, India

Rekha Bisht, Department of Zoology, S. V. Govt. P.G. College, Lohaghat, Champawat, Uttarakhand, India

Department of Zoology, S. V. Govt. P.G. College, Lohaghat, Champawat, Uttarakhand, India

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How to Cite
Kandpal, V., Kumar, D., & Bisht, R. (2019). Protective Effect of Vitamin E on Haematological Parameters in Chronic Toxicity of Hexavalent Chromium in Laboratory Chicks. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 9(3), 388-392. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v9i3.2889