Oral Mucosal Immunization Recent Advancement and Exploit Dendritic Cell Targeting

  • Daisy Arora Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga, Punjab, India.
  • Sushmita Rana Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga, Punjab, India.
  • GD. Gupta Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga, Punjab, India
  • Amit Chaudhary Department of Pharmaceutics, Abhilashi University Mandi, Chail Chowk (H.P), India
  • Bhupendra Singh Department of Pharmaceutics, Abhilashi University Mandi, Chail Chowk (H.P), India

Abstract

Oral mucosal vaccine thrive significant interest in developing vaccines that evoke mucosal moreover systemic immune response i.e. induction of IgA. Oral immunization consistently preferred over conventional immunization because it provides strengthens inpatient acquiescence, needle-free delivery, cost-effective. Thereby strong antibody production at the mucosal site is not refreshing by parenteral administration of the vaccines. Antibodies produced on the mucosal surface instead of it also start common mucosal immune system (CMIS). Vaccines allow particulate delivery protection of antigen. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid, poly lactic acid loaded nanoparticles, liposomes, niosomes, dendrimers; proteosomes are some of the nanocarriers which protect the antigen from their degradation. Authentication concepts of various studies on the mucosal vaccine by using nanotechnology for targeting to dendritic cell presenting on Peyer's patch elicit antibody production. This review sums up current studies on mucosal vaccination by using nanocarrier. More of the studies have been done on mucosal for improvement in methodology.


Keywords: Antigen, Nanotechnology, Dendritic cells, Peyer’s patch, Vaccine

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Author Biographies

Daisy Arora, Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga, Punjab, India.

Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga, Punjab, India.

Sushmita Rana, Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga, Punjab, India.

Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga, Punjab, India.

GD. Gupta, Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga, Punjab, India

Department of Pharmaceutics, ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga, Punjab, India

Amit Chaudhary, Department of Pharmaceutics, Abhilashi University Mandi, Chail Chowk (H.P), India

Department of Pharmaceutics, Abhilashi University Mandi, Chail Chowk (H.P), India

Bhupendra Singh, Department of Pharmaceutics, Abhilashi University Mandi, Chail Chowk (H.P), India

Department of Pharmaceutics, Abhilashi University Mandi, Chail Chowk (H.P), India

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How to Cite
Arora, D., Rana, S., Gupta, G., Chaudhary, A., & Singh, B. (2019). Oral Mucosal Immunization Recent Advancement and Exploit Dendritic Cell Targeting. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 9(3), 704-711. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v9i3.2861