A Review on Novel Drug Delivery System: A Recent Trend

  • Akash Bandawane epartment of Pharmaceutical Quality assurance, R.G. Sapkal College of Pharmacy, Anjaneri, Nashik , Maharashtra, India- 422 213
  • Ravindranath Saudagar Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, R.G Sapkal College of Pharmacy, Anjaneri, Nashik-422213, Maharashtra, India.

Abstract

Plants are nature’s remedies and have been used by human beings on earth since ancient times for food and medicine. Today there are global movements towards finding of herbal medicaments in plants to bring them in market via a suitable drug delivery system for mankind. The basic thought behind it is treatment of each disease is hidden in nature. However, delivery of herbal drugs also requires modification with the purpose to achieve sustain release, to increase patient compliance etc. previously herbal drugs could not attract scientists towards the modifications of novel drug delivery systems due to processing, standardizing, extracting and identification difficulties. But now days with the advancement in the technology, novel drug delivery systems (NDDS) open the door towards the development of herbal novel drug delivery system. With use of advance techniques protection from toxicity, enhancement in stability, improved bioavailability of herbal formulations, protection from physical and chemical degradation can be achieve. Novel drug delivery technologies have gained the importance to achieve modified delivery of herbal drugs their by increasing the therapeutic value as well as reducing toxicity. The main goal for developing such delivery systems is to minimize drug degradation and loss, to prevent harmful side effects and to increase bioavailability. Targeting is the ability to direct the drug loaded system to the site of interest. Among drug carrier one can name soluble polymers, microparticles made of insoluble (or) biodegradable natural and synthetic polymers, microcapsules, cells, cell ghosts, lipoproteins, liposomes and micelles. Two major mechanisms can be distinguished for addressing the desired sites for drug release, (a) Passive and (b) Active targeting. Controlled drug carrier systems such as micellar solutions, vescicles and liquid crystal dispersions, as well as nanoparticle dispersions consisting of small particles of 10 – 400 nm show great promise as drug delivery systems. Hydrogels are three dimensional, hydrophilic, polymer networks capable of imbibing large amounts of water or biological fluids.


 

Keywords: New drug delivery system Phytosome, Nanoparticles, Microsphere, Transdermal Drug Delivery SystemCarriers, Colloidal drug carriers

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Author Biographies

Akash Bandawane, epartment of Pharmaceutical Quality assurance, R.G. Sapkal College of Pharmacy, Anjaneri, Nashik , Maharashtra, India- 422 213

epartment of Pharmaceutical Quality assurance, R.G. Sapkal College of Pharmacy, Anjaneri,  Nashik , Maharashtra, India- 422 213

Ravindranath Saudagar, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, R.G Sapkal College of Pharmacy, Anjaneri, Nashik-422213, Maharashtra, India.

Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, R.G Sapkal College of Pharmacy, Anjaneri, Nashik-422213, Maharashtra, India.

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Bandawane, A., & Saudagar, R. (2019). A Review on Novel Drug Delivery System: A Recent Trend. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 9(3), 517-521. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v9i3.2610