A study of medication adherence in general population in and around Bengaluru

  • CM Chethan 1Pharm D Interns, Department of Pharmacy Practice, PES College of Pharmacy, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India-560 050.
  • Chaudhary Indrajeet 1Pharm D Interns, Department of Pharmacy Practice, PES College of Pharmacy, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India-560 050.
  • TM Kishor Kumar 1Pharm D Interns, Department of Pharmacy Practice, PES College of Pharmacy, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India-560 050.
  • Dev Apoorva 2Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, PES College of Pharmacy, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India-560 050.

Abstract

Background: Medication adherence is "The degree to which the person's behaviour of taking medication, following a diet, and/or executing lifestyle changes -corresponds with the agreed recommendations from a health care provider”. Lack of Medication adherence is one of the major drug problem and leads to unnecessary disease progression, disease complication, reduced functional abilities, a lower quality of life and even death. Adherence to medication is low in specific populations who need chronic medication. Adherence to medication is also of interest in a more general fashion, independent of specific populations or side effects of particular drugs. If clinicians and researchers expect patients to show close to full adherence, it is relevant to know how likely the achievement of this goal is. Population based rates can provide an estimate of efforts needed to achieve near complete adherence in patient population.


Objective: To evaluate the medication adherence in general population.


Methods and Findings: This is an observational prospective study conducted for a period of 6 months at different area of Bengaluru, Karnataka. We assessed 518 participants. Adherence was measured by modified Morisky Adherence Index. We also assessed current medication intake and side effects. We found that, male adherence was 56 (18.2%) and female adherence was 32 (15.2%). By observing the education background 89 medical background participants 13 (14.6%) participants show adherence, 63 (70.7%) participants show medium adherence and 13 (14.6%) participants show non-adherence. Out of 429 non-medical background participants 84 (19.6%) participants show adherence, 262 (50.6%) participants show medium adherence and 83 (19.3%) participants show non-adherence.


Conclusion: Our study concluded that males show more adherence than females. Participants belonged to medical background were more adhere to the medication than the participants from non-medical background. The most dictating reason for not taking medication is forgetfulness. Hence, medication adherence is very essential for the quick recovery of the patients and to improve the quality of life.


Keywords: Medication adherence, Morisky Scale, reasons for non-adherence, education.

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Author Biographies

CM Chethan, 1Pharm D Interns, Department of Pharmacy Practice, PES College of Pharmacy, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India-560 050.

1Pharm D Interns, Department of Pharmacy Practice, PES College of Pharmacy, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India-560 050.

Chaudhary Indrajeet, 1Pharm D Interns, Department of Pharmacy Practice, PES College of Pharmacy, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India-560 050.

1Pharm D Interns, Department of Pharmacy Practice, PES College of Pharmacy, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India-560 050.

TM Kishor Kumar, 1Pharm D Interns, Department of Pharmacy Practice, PES College of Pharmacy, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India-560 050.

1Pharm D Interns, Department of Pharmacy Practice, PES College of Pharmacy, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India-560 050.

Dev Apoorva, 2Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, PES College of Pharmacy, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India-560 050.

2Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, PES College of Pharmacy, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India-560 050.

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How to Cite
Chethan, C., Indrajeet, C., Kishor Kumar, T., & Apoorva, D. (2019). A study of medication adherence in general population in and around Bengaluru. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 9(2-s), 248-256. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v9i2-s.2504