Nanoparticles: A smart drug delivery

  • S Venkateswara Rao Department of Pharmaceutics, Vijaya Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences for Women, Enikepadu, Vijayawada–521108, India
  • E Anuhya Department of Pharmaceutics, Vijaya Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences for Women, Enikepadu, Vijayawada–521108, India
  • K Padmalatha Department of Pharmacology, Vijaya Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences for Women, Enikepadu, Vijayawada–521108, India

Abstract

In recent years, there has been an exponential interest in the development of novel drug delivery systems using nanoparticles. Nanoparticles are defined as particulate dispersions or solid particles with size in the range of 10-1000nm. There has been a considerable research interest in the area of drug delivery using particulate delivery systems as carriers for small and large molecules. Particulate systems like nanoparticles have been used as a physical approach to alter and improve the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of various types of drug molecules. Nanoparticles have been extensively studied as particulate carriers in the pharmaceutical and medical fields, because they show promise as drug delivery systems as a result of their sustained and targeting release properties, subcellular size, biocompatibility with tissue and cells. Various polymers have been used in the formulation of nanoparticles for targeting drug delivery research to increase therapeutic benefit, while minimizing side effects. Polymeric nanoparticls with a size in the nanometer range protect drugs against in vitro and in vivo degradation. The use of nanoparticle drug delivery is a universal approach to increase the therapeutic performance of poorly soluble drugs in any route of administration. In this review focused various aspects of nanoparticle formulation, characterization and their applications in targeting delivery.


Keywords: Nanoparticles, Drug Targeting and Controlled Release.

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Author Biographies

S Venkateswara Rao, Department of Pharmaceutics, Vijaya Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences for Women, Enikepadu, Vijayawada–521108, India

Department of Pharmaceutics, Vijaya Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences for Women, Enikepadu, Vijayawada–521108, India

E Anuhya, Department of Pharmaceutics, Vijaya Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences for Women, Enikepadu, Vijayawada–521108, India

Department of Pharmaceutics, Vijaya Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences for Women, Enikepadu, Vijayawada–521108, India

K Padmalatha, Department of Pharmacology, Vijaya Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences for Women, Enikepadu, Vijayawada–521108, India

Department of Pharmacology, Vijaya Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences for Women, Enikepadu, Vijayawada–521108, India

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How to Cite
Venkateswara Rao, S., Anuhya, E., & Padmalatha, K. (2019). Nanoparticles: A smart drug delivery. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 9(2-s), 590-593. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v9i2-s.2500