Fortification role of Curcumin against renal and testicular toxicity of synthetic food dye brilliant blue in rats

  • Eman Mohamed PhD, Researcher of Molecular Drug Evaluation Department, National Organization for Drug Control and Research (NODCAR), Giza, Egypt.
  • Ibrahim Abo-laila PhD, Researcher of Molecular Drug Evaluation Department, National Organization for Drug Control and Research (NODCAR), Giza, Egypt.
  • Marwa Ashour Masoud PhD, Researcher of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacology, National Organization for Drug Control and Research (NODCAR), Giza, Egypt. P.O. BOX 29

Abstract

Increasing awareness has been lately paid to the toxicity of synthetic additives used in food. The main aim of this study was to survey the renal and testicular toxicity of synthetic food dye brilliant blue. Administration of the BB changed body and relative organs weights, serum creatinine, urea (BUN), uric acid and serum FSH, LH, testosterone levels. This study proved that BB induced oxidative damage as manifested by significant increase in Lipid peroxidation with disorganization in the activity of glutathione peroxidase, protein carbonyl and reactive oxygen species content. Histopathological changes include: infiltration and vacuolation in kidney. In addition; degeneration and necrosis of spermatogoneal cells lining seminiferous tubules in testis. Furthermore; BB induced appotosis via activation of casp-3. Administration of curcumin with BB attenuated the cytotoxic effects of brilliant blue on kidney and testis tissues and reducing apoptotic cell death as well as improved the redox status of kidney and testis.


Keywords:  Brilliant blue dye, Curcumin, Kidney, Testis, Histopathology, Rats.

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Author Biographies

Eman Mohamed, PhD, Researcher of Molecular Drug Evaluation Department, National Organization for Drug Control and Research (NODCAR), Giza, Egypt.

PhD, Researcher of Molecular Drug Evaluation Department, National Organization for Drug Control and Research (NODCAR), Giza, Egypt.

Ibrahim Abo-laila, PhD, Researcher of Molecular Drug Evaluation Department, National Organization for Drug Control and Research (NODCAR), Giza, Egypt.

PhD, Researcher of Molecular Drug Evaluation Department, National Organization for Drug Control and Research (NODCAR), Giza, Egypt.

Marwa Ashour Masoud, PhD, Researcher of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacology, National Organization for Drug Control and Research (NODCAR), Giza, Egypt. P.O. BOX 29

PhD, Researcher of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacology, National Organization for Drug Control and Research (NODCAR), Giza, Egypt. P.O. BOX 29

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1.
Mohamed E, Abo-laila I, Masoud M. Fortification role of Curcumin against renal and testicular toxicity of synthetic food dye brilliant blue in rats. JDDT [Internet]. 15Mar.2019 [cited 18Aug.2022];9(2):1-. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/2448