An overview about Hedychium spicatum: a review

  • Shafiqa Rasool Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal Srinagar-190006, Jammu and Kashmir, India
  • Mudasir Maqbool Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal Srinagar-190006, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Abstract

The Indian Himalayan Region (IHR) serves as tremendous repository of plant biodiversity which is derived from extreme altitudinal gradients and phenomenal geographic provinces and has been proved as the richest reservoir of medicinal plants and aromatic plants. The lavish range of plant biodiversity in IHR is supported by various landscape features that provide myriad of habitats. Hedychium spicatum Buch-Ham (Zingiberaceae), commonly known as spiked ginger lily, is found in the entire Himalayan region. Rhizome contains about 4% of essential oil and its phytochemical investigations have shown the presence of a variety of terpenoids (monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids and diterpenoids).Traditionally, the rhizomes are used in the treatment of respiratory disorders, fevers, tranquilizer, hypotensive, antispasmodic, CNS depressant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, antifungal, pediculicidal and cytotoxic activities. The family Zingiberaceae well known for its immense medicinal values is distributed widely throughout the tropics, particularly in Southeast Asia. Zingiberaceae family is an important natural resource that provides many useful products for food, spices, medicines, dyes, perfume and aesthetics. Ethnobiologically, H. spicatum is not commonly popular throughout the Indian Himalayan region, but multifarious uses are practised specifically in different regions. In this review, we will briefly explain about the various multi-faceted aspects about Hedychium spicatum.


Keywords: Hedychium spicatum, Chemical composition, Rhizomes, Zingiberaceae.

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Author Biographies

Shafiqa Rasool, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal Srinagar-190006, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal Srinagar-190006, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Mudasir Maqbool, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal Srinagar-190006, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal Srinagar-190006, Jammu and Kashmir, India

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Rasool, S., & Maqbool, M. (2019). An overview about Hedychium spicatum: a review. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 9(1-s), 476-480. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v9i1-s.2429