Evaluation of Anticonvulsant and Antioxidant Activity of Senna occidentalis Seeds Extracts

  • Vijay Vikram Singh Department of Pharmacy, Ram-Eesh Insti¬tute of Vocational and Technical Education, Greater Noida, India
  • Jainendra Jain Department of Pharmacy, Ram-Eesh Insti¬tute of Vocational and Technical Education, Greater Noida, India
  • Arun Kumar Mishra Phytochemistry Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, IFTM University, Moradabad, India

Abstract

Aim: The aim of present work was to determine the anticonvulsant and antioxidant activity of Senna occidentalis L. ethanolic seed extract by different mod­els. Methods: For evaluation of anticonvulsant activity, Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure model and Maximal electroshock (MES) seizure model were used. For antioxidant activity, (1, 1-diphenyl - 2-picryl hydrazine (DPPH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) method were used. Results: The finding suggested that the ethanolic extract (EAE) of Senna occidentalis in the dose 400 mg/kg body weight posses potent anticonvulsant activity. The EAE showed anticonvulsant action in dose dependent fashion. It was observed that upon increasing the concentration of extract, it showed reduced absorbance and increased free radical inhibition, and when comparison was made with Ascorbic acid, it showed marked antioxidant property in DPPH as well as H2O2 method. The IC50 of Ascorbic acid and EAE by DPPH method were found to be 14.56 and 14.8 respectively whereas the IC50 of Ascorbic acid and EAE by H2O2 method were found that 14.3and 14.8 respectively. Conclusion: The results of the present study concluded hat the EAE of Senna occidentalis L. possesses significant antioxidant and anticonvulsant activity. The activity was in dose dependent fashion. This study will assist in future research associated with formulation development of seeds of Senna occidentalis L.


Keyword: Senna occidentalis L., Anticonvulsant, Antioxidant, DPPH model

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Author Biographies

Vijay Vikram Singh, Department of Pharmacy, Ram-Eesh Insti¬tute of Vocational and Technical Education, Greater Noida, India

Department of Pharmacy, Ram-Eesh Insti­tute of Vocational and Technical Education, Greater Noida, India

Jainendra Jain, Department of Pharmacy, Ram-Eesh Insti¬tute of Vocational and Technical Education, Greater Noida, India

Department of Pharmacy, Ram-Eesh Insti­tute of Vocational and Technical Education, Greater Noida, India

Arun Kumar Mishra, Phytochemistry Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, IFTM University, Moradabad, India

Phytochemistry Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, IFTM University, Moradabad, India

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Singh VV, Jain J, Mishra AK. Evaluation of Anticonvulsant and Antioxidant Activity of Senna occidentalis Seeds Extracts. JDDT [Internet]. 15Mar.2019 [cited 3Mar.2021];9(2):183-7. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/2400