Evaluation of Antidepressant Activity of Ethanolic Extract of Abies webbiana and Berberis aristata in Laboratory Animals

  • sucheta gautam IFTM University
  • Neetu Sachan Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of pharmacy, IFTM University, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Alankar Shrivastav Department of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy Academy, IFTM University, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Dilipkumar Pal Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya, Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh 495009, India

Abstract

Abstract


Objective: Abies webbiana and Berberis aristata is an herbal plant that has several therapeutic effects. It also heals depression, grief, nervous stress and tension. In the present study we evaluated anti-depressant effect of ethanolic extract from Abies webbiana and Berberis aristata by using Forced Swimming Test (FST) and Tail Suspension Test (TST).


Methods: Two doses of ethanolic extract of Abies webbiana and berberis aristata (200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg) was given orally. Immobility time were measured after 30 min after the dosing and compared with control group and Flouxetine (25mg/kg) as a standard group.


Results: The ethanolic extract of BA and AW (400 mg/kg) was found to be effective and it exhibited activity similar to that of the conventional drug Flouxetine (25mg/kg) (p<0.001) whereas 200 mg/kg dose showed higher activity with significantly increased swimming time and suspension time and decreased immobility time than 400 mg/kg of ethanolic extracts and Flouxetine (25mg/kg).


Conclusion: These results proposed 400 mg/kg of ethanolic extract was showed higher anti-depressant activity as compared to control which is similar to the standard.

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Author Biographies

Neetu Sachan, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of pharmacy, IFTM University, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of pharmacy, IFTM University, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

Alankar Shrivastav, Department of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy Academy, IFTM University, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

Department of Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy Academy, IFTM University, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

Dilipkumar Pal, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya, Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh 495009, India

Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya, Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh 495009, India

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gautam, sucheta, Sachan, N., Shrivastav, A., & Pal, D. (2019). Evaluation of Antidepressant Activity of Ethanolic Extract of Abies webbiana and Berberis aristata in Laboratory Animals. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 9(1), 244-247. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v9i1.2290