Dermal application of lactic acid based cream of a non pathogenic Kocuria marina (BMKO1) strain against Epidermophyton floccosum (MTCC 613) symptomatic excision mice model

  • Soumya S Dash Laboratory of Medical Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar, Burla, 768019, Odisha, India
  • Smaranika Pattnaik Laboratory of Medical Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar, Burla, 768019, Odisha, India

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal efficacy of Kocuria marina (BMKo1) derived Lactic acid against Epidermophyton floccosum (MTCC-613) infections induced on male Swiss Albino mice model (Mus musculus).  For this purpose, the isolated strain was subjected to ‘flask fermentation’ and the Lactic acid produced as fermentation product, was quantified and analysed. Prior to preclinical test, healthy mice models of approximately 8 weeks old and 25-30 gm (weight) were subjected to intra-dermal administration for a period of 15 days to test for toxicity. Mortality, clinical signs, body weight changes were continually monitored. Then the mouse models were inoculated with 100 µl/ml (V/V) of E. floccosum (MTCC-613) spore suspensions following ‘Excision model’. After induction of the infection, the symptomatic mice groups were subjected to topical application of Kocuria lactic acid cream based formulation at a concentration of 1µl/ml (V/V). The naked eye observations were made on the infected lesions till the absolute deduction of infection of excised skin surfaces. The degrees of deduction of infection were converted into scores and the percentages (%) of deduction of infection were calculated and the average value was derived. There were inclusion of positive control (Fluconazole) and negative control (group with infection induced excision, but without any drug application) mice groups for the sake of comparison. Further, with absolute deduction of infection score observed in mice group, applied with Kocuria derived Lactic acid was akin to Fluconazole activity. However, the infection induced mice group was found to be with substantial increase of degree of infection. This study have curtain raised about the anti Epidermophyton infection activity of a cream based  Cell free Lactic acid derived from a non pathogenic strain of Kocuria marina on mouse models.


Keywords: Kocuria marina, Epidermophyton floccosum, Lactic acid

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Soumya S Dash, Laboratory of Medical Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar, Burla, 768019, Odisha, India

Laboratory of Medical Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar, Burla, 768019, Odisha, India

Smaranika Pattnaik, Laboratory of Medical Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar, Burla, 768019, Odisha, India

Laboratory of Medical Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, Sambalpur University, Jyoti Vihar, Burla, 768019, Odisha, India

References

1) Woodfolk J A. Allergy and Dermatophytes. Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 2005; 18(1):30-43.
2) Shimaa M A E, Ouf S A, Moussa T A A, Eltahlawi S M R. Dermatophytes and other associated fungi in patients attending to some hospitals in Egypt. Braz. J. Microbiol. 2015; 4 (3):799-805.
3) Achterman R R, White T C. Dermatophyte Virulence Factors: Identifying and Analyzing Genes that may contribute to chronic or acute skin Infections. Int. J. Microbiol. 2012; 2012:358305.
4) Gupta S, Kesarla R, Omri A. Formulation Strategies to Improve the Bioavailability of Poorly Absorbed Drugs with S
5) pecial Emphasis on Self-Emulsifying Systems. Hindawi Publ. Co. 2013; 2013:848043.
6) Kalepu S, Nekkanti V. Insoluble drug delivery strategies: review of recent advances and business prospects. Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B. 2015; 5(5):442–453.
7) Keller T H, Pichota A, Yin Z. A practical view of druggability. Curr. Opinion Chem. Biol. 2006; 10:357–361.
8) Nomura D K, Maimone T J. Target Identification of Bioactive Covalently Acting Natural Products. Curr. Topics Microbiol. Immunol. (2018). DOI 10.1007/82_2018_121.
9) Kumar S V, Saravanan D, Kumar B, Jayakumar A. An update on prodrugs from natural products. Asian Pac. J. Trop. Med. 2014; 7S1:S54-9.
10) Sinoussi F B, Montagutelli. Animal models are essential to biological research: issues and perspectives. Future Sci. OA 2015; 1(4): FSO63.
11) Matsuda T, Yano T, Mayurama A, Kumagai H. Antimicrobial activities of organic acids determined by minimum inhibitory concentrations at different pH ranged from 4.0 to 7.0. Jap. Soc. Food Sci. Technol. 1994; 41:687-701.
12) Higginbotham C. Molecular recycling: Application of the twelve principles of green chemistry in the diversion of post-consumer poly (lactic acid) waste. J. Mat. Edu. 2008; 30:257-280.
13) Simoes A, Veiga F, VitorinoC, Figueiras A. A Tutorial for Developing a Topical Cream Formulation Based on the Quality by Design Approach. J. Pharmaceut. Sci. 2018; 107(10):2653-2662.
14) Patel N A, Patel N J, Patel R P. Comparative development and evaluation of topical gel and cream formulations of psoralen. Drug Discov Ther. 2009; 3(5):234-242.
15) Chowdhury M H , Ryan L K, Cherabuddi K, Freeman K B, Weaver D G, Pelletier J C, Scott R W, Diamond G, Antifungal potential of host defense peptide mimetics in a Mouse Model of disseminated Candidiasis. J. Fungi. 2018; 4(30):4010030.
16) Ganga-suresh P, Ganesana R, Dharmalingama M, Baskar S, Senthil-kumar P, Evaluation of Wound Healing Activity of “SbutilonIndicum” Linn. in Wister Albino Rats. Int. J. Biol. Med. Res. 2011; 2(4):908 – 911.
17) Ganga-suresh P, Ganesana R, Dharmalingama M, Baskar S, Senthil-kumar P, Evaluation of Wound Healing Activity of “SbutilonIndicum” Linn. in Wister Albino Rats. Int. J. Biol. Med. Res. 2011; 2(4):908-911.
18) Hager C L, Larkin E L, Long L, Zohra Abidi F, Shaw K J, Ghannoum M A, In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the antifungal activity of APX001A/APX001 against Candida auris. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 2018; 62(3):e02319-17.
19) Hohl T M, Overview of Vertebrate Animal Models of Fungal Infection. J. Immunol. Methods. 2014; 0:100–112.
20) Lau K M, Wong J H, Wu Y O, Cheng L, Wong C W, To M H, Lau C P, Yew D T, Leung P C, Fung K P, Hui M, Ng T B, Lau C B,. Anti-dermatophytic activity of Bakuchiol: In vitro mechanistic studies and in vivo tinea pedis-inhibiting activity in a guinea pig model. Phytomedicine. 2014; 21(7):942-945.
21) McLellan C A, Vincent B M, Solis N V, Lancaster A K, Sullivan L B, Hartland C L, Youngsaye W, Filler S G, Whitesell L, Lindquist S, Inhibiting mitochondrial phosphate transport as an unexploited antifungal strategy. Nat. Chem. Biol. 2018; 14(2):135–141.
22) Mousavi S A A, Kazemi A, In vitro and in vivo antidermatophytic activities of some Iranian medicinal plants. Med. Mycol. 2015; 53(8):852-859.
23) Muntha P, Drug discovery & development – A Review. Res. & Rev.: J. Pharm. Pharmaceut. Sci. 2016; 5(1):135-142.
24) Nyong E E, Odeniyi M A, Moody J O, In vitro and in vivo antimicrobial evaluation of alkaloidalextracts of Enantia chlorantha stems bark and their formulated ointments. Acta Poloniae Pharmaceutica - Drug Research. 2015; 72(1):147-152.
25) Padhan D K, Pattnaik S, In vivo antifungal activity of Acmella essential oil on a dermatomycotic strain Trichophyton mentagrophytes (MTCC-7687). Der Pharmacia Sinica. 2014; 5(1):40-44.
Statistics
88 Views | 132 Downloads
How to Cite
Dash, S. S., & Pattnaik, S. (2019). Dermal application of lactic acid based cream of a non pathogenic Kocuria marina (BMKO1) strain against Epidermophyton floccosum (MTCC 613) symptomatic excision mice model. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 9(1-s), 113-120. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v9i1-s.2271