In-vivo antiviral potential of crude extracts derived from Tribulus terrestris against newcastle disease virus

  • Aqeela Malik Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Lahore-Pakistan
  • Muhammad Danish Mehmood Ottoman Pharma (Immuno Division), Raiwind Road Lahore-Pakistan
  • Huma Anwar Ottoman Pharma (Immuno Division), Raiwind Road Lahore-Pakistan
  • sana noreen Ottoman Pharma Immuno Division, Lahore
  • Umer Sultan Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Lahore-Pakistan

Abstract

Viral problems have been in focused of the scientists due to their high metabolic rate, drug resistance and unique nature of pathological mechanism. The failure of novel synthetic allopathic antiviral drugs propels the scientists to investigate other sources of alternative antiviral agents. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) and spectrophotometry were conducted by using standard methods of phytochemical analysis of bioactive components. The methanolic extracts of Tribulus terrestris showed higher phytochemical phenols followed by tannins, alkaloids, carotenoid, saponins quantified by spectrophotometer assay.  The current study was done to evaluate the in vivo antiviral potential of crude extracts of medicinal plant by means of NDV Haemagglutination (HA) titer in vivo vero cell line culture. Furthermore, different doses of crude extract such as 20µl/ml, 40µl/ml, 60µlml and 80µl/ml were interacted with Lasota strain of the NDV (EID50= 1×105, HAU= I05) in 90% saturated vero cell line with constant supply of CO2 at 37°C. It is evaluated that the prevention dose (80µl/ml) of Tribulus terrestris (Pre-treatment) against Newcastle disease virus on vero cell line (2.5±1.0) just before 24 hour of infection is declared as optimum effective time period to counter these agents as compared to Co-treatment (80ul/ml) (3.0±1.15) and Post treatment (80µl/ml) (3.50±1.00). It is suggested from the results of current study that T. terristris showed enormous anti Newcastle disease virus effect in vero cell line adapted virus particularly when used as preventive antiviral therapy at the dose rate not less than 80ul/ml just before onset of disease.

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Author Biographies

Aqeela Malik, Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Lahore-Pakistan

Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Lahore-Pakistan

Muhammad Danish Mehmood, Ottoman Pharma (Immuno Division), Raiwind Road Lahore-Pakistan

Ottoman Pharma (Immuno Division), Raiwind Road Lahore-Pakistan

Huma Anwar, Ottoman Pharma (Immuno Division), Raiwind Road Lahore-Pakistan

Ottoman Pharma (Immuno Division), Raiwind Road Lahore-Pakistan

Umer Sultan, Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Lahore-Pakistan

Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Lahore-Pakistan

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How to Cite
Malik, A., Mehmood, M., Anwar, H., noreen, sana, & Sultan, U. (2018). In-vivo antiviral potential of crude extracts derived from Tribulus terrestris against newcastle disease virus. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 8(6), 149-154. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v8i6.2114