Ethnobotanical uses and pharmacological activities of Argyreia cuneata (Willd.) Ker Gawl. (Convolvulaceae) – A review.

  • T.R. Prashith Kekuda Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India
  • K.S. Vinayaka Department of Botany, Kumadvathi First Grade College, Shimoga Road, Shikaripura-577427, Karnataka, India

Abstract

Argyreia cuneata (Willd.) Ker Gawl. is a sub-erect silky shrub and belongs to the family Convolvulaceae. An updated information on ethnobotanical uses and pharmacological activities of A. cuneata is presented in this review. The plant finds traditional uses as a remedy for human and veterinary ailments. The plant is used to treat diabetes, helminthic infections, skin cuts, to initiate labor pain and to ease delivery. As an ethnoveterinary practice, the plant is used against retention of fetal membrane, anorexia and swelling of throat. The plant is reported to contain phytochemicals such as alkaloids and flavonoids. The plant is shown to exhibit some pharmacological activities viz. analgesic, antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant, wound healing, antipyretic, anthelmintic and antidiabetic activities.


Keywords: Argyreia cuneata (Willd.) Ker Gawl., Ethnobotanical, Traditional uses, Phytochemistry, Pharmacological activities

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Author Biographies

T.R. Prashith Kekuda, Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India

Department of Microbiology, S.R.N.M.N College of Applied Sciences, N.E.S campus, Balraj Urs Road, Shivamogga-577201, Karnataka, India

K.S. Vinayaka, Department of Botany, Kumadvathi First Grade College, Shimoga Road, Shikaripura-577427, Karnataka, India

Department of Botany, Kumadvathi First Grade College, Shimoga Road, Shikaripura-577427, Karnataka, India

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1.
Prashith Kekuda T, Vinayaka K. Ethnobotanical uses and pharmacological activities of Argyreia cuneata (Willd.) Ker Gawl. (Convolvulaceae) – A review. JDDT [Internet]. 15Dec.2018 [cited 28Oct.2020];8(6-s):366-9. Available from: http://jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/2103