Noisomes: as novel vesicular drug delivery system

  • Sudhir Kumar Ray School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India
  • Nargish Bano School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India
  • Tripti Shukla School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India
  • Neeraj Upmanyu School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India
  • Sharad P. Pandey Truba Institute of Pharmacy, Bhopal (M.P.), India
  • Geeta Parkhe School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India

Abstract

Target-specific drug-delivery systems for the administration of pharmaceutical compounds enable the localization of drugs to target sites within the body.  The basic component of drug delivery systems is an appropriate carrier that protects the drug from rapid degradation or clearance and thereby enhances drug concentration in target tissues. Niosome are microscopic non-ionic surfactant bilayer vesicles obtained on hydration of synthetic nonionic surfactants, with or without incorporation of cholesterol or their lipids. The amphiphilic nature of niosomes promotes their efficiency in encapsulating lipophilic or hydrophilic drugs.  Noisome are promising vehicle for drug delivery and being non-ionic, more stable, inexpensive, biodegradable, biocompatible, non immunogenic and exhibit flexibility in their structural characterization. Various additives in niosomes include nonionic surfactant as film forming agent, cholesterol as stabilizing and rigidizing agent for the bilayer and various charge inducers which develop a charge on the surface of niosomes and stabilize the prepared formulation by the resulting repulsive forces. Niosomes have been widely evaluated for controlled release and targeted delivery for the treatment of cancer, viral infections, microbial diseases, psoriasis, leishmaniasis, migraine, parkinson and other diseases. Niosomes can prolong the circulation of the entrapped drug in body. Encapsulation of drug in vesicular system can be predicted to prolong the existence of drug in the systemic circulation and enhance penetration into target tissue, perhaps reduce toxicity if selective uptake can be achieved. In addition to conventional, oral and parenteral routes, they are amenable to be delivered by ocular, transdermal, vaginal and inhalation routes. Delivery of biotechnological products including vaccine delivery with niosomes is also an interesting and promising research area. More concerted research efforts, however, are still required to realize the full potential of these novel systems. This review article focuses on the concept of niosomes, advantages and disadvantages, composition, method of preparation, separation of unentrapped drug, factors influencing the niosomal formulation and characterization, marketed formulations of niosomes and also gives up to date information regarding recent applications of niosomes in drug delivery.


Keyword:  Drug-delivery system, Niosomes, 

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Sudhir Kumar Ray, School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India

School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India

Nargish Bano, School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India

School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India

Tripti Shukla, School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India

School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India

Neeraj Upmanyu, School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India

School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India

Sharad P. Pandey, Truba Institute of Pharmacy, Bhopal (M.P.), India

Truba Institute of Pharmacy, Bhopal (M.P.), India

Geeta Parkhe, School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India

School of Pharmacy & Research Peoples University, Bhopal (M.P.), India

References

1. Seleci M, Seleci D, Joncyzk R, Stahl F, Blume C, Scheper ST. Smart multifunctional nanoparticles in nanomedicine, BioNanoMaterials, 2016; 17(1-2):33-41.
2. Malhotra M, Jain NK. Niosomes as drug carriers. Indian Drugs. 1994; 31:81–6.
3. Udupa N. Niosomes as drug carriers. In: Jain NK, editor. Controlled and novel drug delivery. 1st edition. New Delhi: CBS Publishers and Distributors; 2002.
4. Baillie AJ, Florence AT, Hume LR, Muirhead GT, Rogerson A. The Preparation and propereties of Niosomes-Non ionic surfactant vesicles. J Pharm Pharmacol. 1985; 37:863–8.
5. Hu C, Rhodes DG. Proniosomes: A Novel Drug Carrier Preparation. Int J Pharm. 1999; 185:23–35.
6. Azmin MN, Florence AT, Handjani-Vila RM, Stuart JF, Vanlerberghe G, Whittaker JS. The effect of non-ionic surfactant vesicle (noisome) entrapment on the absorption and distribution of methoterxate in mice. J Pharm Pharmacol. 1985; 37:237–42.
7. Szoka F, Jr, Papahadjopoulos D. Comparative properties and methods of preparation of lipid vesicles (liposomes) Annu Rev Biophys Bioeng. 1980; 9:467–508.
8. Jadon PS, Gajbhiye V, Jadon RS, Gajbhiye KR, Ganesh N. Enhanced oral bioavailability of griseofulvin via niosomes. AAPS PharmSciTech. 2009; 10:1186–92.
9. Sheena IP, Singh UV, Kamath R, Uma Devi P, Udupa N. Niosomal withaferin A, with better tumor efficiency. Indian J Pharm Sci. 1998; 60:45–8.
10. Baillie AJ, Coombs GH, Dolan TF, Laurie J. Non-ionic surfactant vesicles, niosomes, as delivery system for the anti-leishmanial drug, sodium stibogluconate. J Pharm Pharmacol. 1986; 38:502–5.
11. Gregoriadis G. Targeting of drugs: Implications in medicine. Lancet. 1981; 2:241–6.
12. Hunter CA, Dolan TF, Coombs GH, Baillie AJ. Vesicular systems (Niosome and Liposomes) for delivery of sodium stibogluconate in experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis. J Pharm Pharmacol. 1988; 40:161–5.
13. Brewer JM, Alexander J. The adjuvant activity of non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) on the BALB/c humoral response to bovine serum albumin. Immunology. 1992; 75:570–5
14. Moser P, Marchand-Arvier M, Labrude P, Handjani -Vila RM, Vignerson C. Hemoglobin niosomes. I. Preparation, functional and physico-chemical properties, and stability. Pharma Acta Helv. 1989; 64:192–202.
15. Moser P, Arvier MM, Labrude P, Vignerson C. Niosomes of hemoglobine. II. Vitro interactions with plasma proteins and phagocytes. Pharm Acta Helv. 1990; 65:82–92.
16. Jayaraman SC, Ramachandran C, Weiner N. Topical delivery of erythromycin from various formulations: An in vivo hairless mouse study. J Pharm Sci. 1996; 85:1082–4.
17. Rogerson A, Cummings J, Willmott N, Florence AT, The distribution of doxorubicin in mice following administration in niosomes, J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 1988; 40(5):337–342.
18. Baillie AJ, Coombs GH, Dolan TF. Non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) as delivery system for the anti- leishmanial drug, sodium stribogluconate, J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 1986; 38:502-505.
19. Raja Naresh RJ, Chandrashekhar G,. Pillai GK, Udupa N. Antiinflammatory activity of Niosome encapsulated diclofenac sodium with Tween -85 in Arthitic rats, Ind. J. Pharmacol. 1994; 26:46-48.
20. Khandare JN, Madhavi G, Tamhankar BM. Niosomes novel drug delivery system. The East Pharmacist. 1994; 37:61-64.
21. Maver LD, Bally MB, Hope MJ, Cullis PR, Biochem. Biophys. Acta. 1985; 816:294-302.
22. Rogerson A, Cummings J, Willmott N, Florence AT. The distribution of doxorubicin in mice following administration in niosomes. J Pharm Pharmacol. 1988; 40(5):337–342.
23. Baillie A.J, Coombs GH, Dolan TF. Non-ionic surfactant vesicles, niosomes, as delivery system for the anti-leishmanial drug, sodium stribogluconate J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 1986; 38: 502-505.
24. Chauhan S, Luorence MJ. The preparation of polyoxyethylene containing non-ionic surfactant. vesicles. J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 1989; 41: 6p.
25. Yoshioka T, Stermberg B, Florence AT, Preparation and properties of vesicles (niosomes) of sorbitan monoesters (Span 20, 40, 60, and 80) and a sorbitan triester (Span 85), International J. Pharm, 1994;105: 1-6
26. Makeshwar KB, Wasanker SR. Niosomse: a novel drug delivery system. Asian journal of pharmaceutical research. 3(1):16-20.
27. Akhilesh D, Kamath JV. Review on span-60 based non-ionic surfactant vesicles as novel drug delivery. International journal of research in pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences. 2012; 3(1):6-12.
28. Blazek-Walsh AI, Rhodes DG. SEM imaging predicts quality of niosomes from maltodextrin-based proniosomes, Pharm. Res. 2001; 18:656-661.
29. Maurya SD, Prajapati SK, Gupta AK Saxena GK, Dhakar RC, Formulation Development and Evaluation of Ethosome of Stavudine, Indian J.Pharm. Educ. Res. 2010; 44(1):102-108
30. Cable C, Ph.D. Thesis. University of Strathclyade, Glasgow, UK. 1989.
31. DM Sheo, A Shweta, KT Vijay, CD Ram, S Aklavya, M Ghanshyam, Enhanced Transdermal delivery of indinavir sulfate via transfersomes, Pharmacie Globale (IJCP), 2010; 1(06):1-7
32. Albert FC, Mathur R, Wallac DFH. US Patent, W0917179, 1992.
33. Gayatri DS, Venkatesh P, Udupa N, Niosomal sumatriptan succinate for nasal administration, Int. J. Pharm. Sci. 2000; 62(6):479-481.
34. Lohumi A, Rawat S, Sarkar S. A novel drug delivery system: Niosomes review. Journal of drug delivery and therapeutics.2012; 2(5):129-135.
35. Suzuki K, Sokan K. The application of liposome’s to cosmetics. Cosmetic and Toiletries, 1990; 105:65-78.
36. Sudhamani T, Priyadarisini N, Radhakrishnan M. Proniosomes - A Promising Drug Carrier, International Journal of Pharm Tech Research, 2010;2(2):1446-1454.
37. Manpreet K, Kumar S. Progress in the field of niosomes as novel drug delivery system. Indo American Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 2018; 05(05):3417-3424.
Statistics
54 Views | 38 Downloads
How to Cite
Ray, S., Bano, N., Shukla, T., Upmanyu, N., Pandey, S. P., & Parkhe, G. (2018). Noisomes: as novel vesicular drug delivery system. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 8(6), 335-341. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v8i6.2029

Most read articles by the same author(s)