Biochemical characterization and 16s rRNA sequencing of different bacteria from textile dye effluents

  • T Jayaseelan PG Research and Department of Zoology and Biotechnology, A.V.V.M. Sri Pushpam College (Autonomous), Poondi, Thanjavur District, Tamilnadu, India.
  • R Damodaran PG Research and Department of Zoology and Biotechnology, A.V.V.M. Sri Pushpam College (Autonomous), Poondi, Thanjavur District, Tamilnadu, India.
  • S Ganesan PG Research and Department of Zoology and Biotechnology, A.V.V.M. Sri Pushpam College (Autonomous), Poondi, Thanjavur District, Tamilnadu, India.
  • P Mani Department of Biotechnology, Annai College of Arts and Science, Kumbakonam, Tamilnadu, India.

Abstract

Environmental pollution has been identified as a major problem in the modern world. Dyeing effluents have become a vital source of water pollution. Release of coloured textile effluents is undesirable in the aquatic environment as they reduce light penetration, thereby affecting aquatic life and limits utilization of the water media. In Tirupur, the textile factories discharge millions of litres of untreated effluents into the drains that eventually empty into river, Noyyal. The release of coloured compound into water bodies is undesirable not only because of their impact on photosynthesis of aquatic plants but also due to the carcinogenic nature of these dyes and their breakdown products. The ability of bacterial strains isolated from the dye effluent of textile mill sites. Morphological and biochemical characterization was done to identify isolates and was found to be Pseudomonas spp, Bacillus spp and Serattia spp. The isolated strains were finally identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Bacteria are generally identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. The rRNA is the most conserved (least variable) gene in all cells. They were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Serattia liquefaciens. The sequences were deposited in GENBANK. The accession numbers were KU041528, KU041530 and KU041531 respectively. The identification was conformed by 16S rRNA sequencing.


Keywords: Textile Dye Effluents, Bacteria, 16S rRNA, NCBI.

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Author Biographies

T Jayaseelan, PG Research and Department of Zoology and Biotechnology, A.V.V.M. Sri Pushpam College (Autonomous), Poondi, Thanjavur District, Tamilnadu, India.

PG Research and Department of Zoology and Biotechnology, A.V.V.M. Sri Pushpam College (Autonomous), Poondi, Thanjavur District, Tamilnadu, India.

R Damodaran, PG Research and Department of Zoology and Biotechnology, A.V.V.M. Sri Pushpam College (Autonomous), Poondi, Thanjavur District, Tamilnadu, India.

PG Research and Department of Zoology and Biotechnology, A.V.V.M. Sri Pushpam College (Autonomous), Poondi, Thanjavur District, Tamilnadu, India.

S Ganesan, PG Research and Department of Zoology and Biotechnology, A.V.V.M. Sri Pushpam College (Autonomous), Poondi, Thanjavur District, Tamilnadu, India.

PG Research and Department of Zoology and Biotechnology, A.V.V.M. Sri Pushpam College (Autonomous), Poondi, Thanjavur District, Tamilnadu, India.

P Mani, Department of Biotechnology, Annai College of Arts and Science, Kumbakonam, Tamilnadu, India.

Department of Biotechnology, Annai College of Arts and Science, Kumbakonam, Tamilnadu, India.

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How to Cite
Jayaseelan, T., Damodaran, R., Ganesan, S., & Mani, P. (2018). Biochemical characterization and 16s rRNA sequencing of different bacteria from textile dye effluents. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 8(6), 35-40. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v8i6.2004