LONG-TERM INCIDENCE OF CERVICAL CANCER IN WOMEN WITH HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS

  • Subhash Kumar Mishra Golden Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Sri Satya Sai University of Technology & Medical Sciences, Pachama, Sehore-466001-MP, India.
  • Nidhi Vishnoi Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Sri Satya Sai University of Technology & Medical Sciences, Pachama, Sehore-466001-MP, India.

Abstract

Background: The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and compare it with the incidence in HIV-uninfected women.


Methods: In a cohort study of HIV-infected and uninfected women who had Papanicolaou tests obtained every 6 months, pathology reports were retrieved for women who had biopsy results or a self report of ICC. Histology was reviewed when reports confirmed ICC. Incidence rates were calculated and compared with those in HIV-negative women.


Results: After a median follow-up of 10.3 years, 3 ICCs were confirmed in HIV-seropositive women, and none were confirmed in HIV-seronegative women. The ICC incidence rate was not found to be associated significantly with HIV status (HIV-negative women [0 of 100,000 person-years] vs HIV-positive women [21.4 of 100,000 person-years]; P = .59). A calculated incidence rate ratio standardized to expected results from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database that was restricted to HIV-infected Women’s Interagency HIV Study participants was 1.32 (95% confidence interval, 0.27-3.85; P = 0.80).


Conclusions: Among women with HIV in a prospective study that incorporated cervical cancer prevention measures, the incidence of ICC was not significantly higher than that in a comparison group of HIV-negative women.


Keywords: Cervical Cancer, Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Women, Cancer Prevention.

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Author Biographies

Subhash Kumar Mishra Golden, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Sri Satya Sai University of Technology & Medical Sciences, Pachama, Sehore-466001-MP, India.

Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Sri Satya Sai University of Technology & Medical Sciences, Pachama, Sehore-466001-MP, India.

Nidhi Vishnoi, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Sri Satya Sai University of Technology & Medical Sciences, Pachama, Sehore-466001-MP, India.

Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Sri Satya Sai University of Technology & Medical Sciences, Pachama, Sehore-466001-MP, India.

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How to Cite
Golden, S. K., & Vishnoi, N. (2018). LONG-TERM INCIDENCE OF CERVICAL CANCER IN WOMEN WITH HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 8(5-s), 394-399. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v8i5-s.1996
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Research