AWARENESS OF CHEMOTHERAPY SIDE EFFECTS AND ATTITUDE TOWARDS CHEMOTHERAPY USE AMONG CANCER PATIENTS ATTENDING ONCOLOGY CLINIC AT BUGANDO MEDICAL CENTRE, IN MWANZA, NORTHERN TANZANIA

  • Deogratias M Katabalo School of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS), P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania
  • Raphael Matinde School of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS), P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania
  • Stanley Mwita School of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS), P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania
  • Karoli Marwa Department of Pharmacology, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS), P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania
  • Nestory Masalu Department of Oncology, Bugando Medical centre (BMC), P.O. Box 1370, Mwanza, Tanzania

Abstract

Background: Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to kill cancer cells. Because cancer cells generally grow and divide faster than normal cells, they are more susceptible to the action of these drugs. However, damage to healthy cells is unavoidable, and this damage accounts for the side effects linked to these drugs.


Methodology: A cross section study was conducted at oncology department in Bugando Medical Centre. A sample of 216 people was recruited into the study. The data was collected by using the pre-constructed questionnaire. After data collection, the data was transferred into SPSS version 20 and analyzed.


Results: The study found that 88 (40.7%) of the respondents were aware of the chemotherapy side effects whereby majority, 68 (77.3%) of these had been informed by the doctor. Most of the respondents, 197 (92.1%) had a positive attitude towards the use of chemotherapy.


Conclusion: There is still poor awareness of the chemotherapy side effects among the cancer patients attending and receiving chemotherapy in oncology department at Bugando Medical Centre. However, most of the respondents had positive attitude towards the use of chemotherapy


Keywords: Awareness, attitude, chemotherapy, side effects and Tanzania.

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Author Biographies

Deogratias M Katabalo, School of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS), P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania

School of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS), P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania

Raphael Matinde, School of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS), P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania

School of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS), P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania

Stanley Mwita, School of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS), P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania

School of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS), P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania

Karoli Marwa, Department of Pharmacology, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS), P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania

Department of Pharmacology, Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS), P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania

Nestory Masalu, Department of Oncology, Bugando Medical centre (BMC), P.O. Box 1370, Mwanza, Tanzania

Department of Oncology, Bugando Medical centre (BMC), P.O. Box 1370, Mwanza, Tanzania

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How to Cite
Katabalo, D. M., Matinde, R., Mwita, S., Marwa, K., & Masalu, N. (2018). AWARENESS OF CHEMOTHERAPY SIDE EFFECTS AND ATTITUDE TOWARDS CHEMOTHERAPY USE AMONG CANCER PATIENTS ATTENDING ONCOLOGY CLINIC AT BUGANDO MEDICAL CENTRE, IN MWANZA, NORTHERN TANZANIA. Journal of Drug Delivery and Therapeutics, 8(5), 448-454. https://doi.org/10.22270/jddt.v8i5.1900